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Civil War Timeline / Chronology for July 1862

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Year1860 1861 1862 1863 1864 1865 1866 1867 1868 1869
January, 1862 May, 1862 September, 1862
February, 1862 June, 1862 October, 1862
March, 1862 July, 1862 November, 1862
April, 1862 August, 1862 December, 1862
July 1, 1862 Naval assault on Fort McAllister Georgia
  Fort McAllister
July 1, 1862 Battle of Malvern Hill
Battle of Malvern Cliffs

Robert E. Lee [CS] attacked George B. McClellan [U.S.], whose men made a gallant stand in front of the James River. Lee called off his attack after failing to break the Union line.
Virginia
  George McClellan
  Robert E. Lee
  Lafayette McLaws
  Seven Days Retreat
  Battle of Malvern Hill
  Fitz-John Porter
  Darius Couch
July 1, 1862 President Lincoln signs the Pacific Railway Act, incorporating the Union Pacific Railroad and subsidizing it with federal funds
  Abraham Lincoln
July 1, 1862 [circa] General David Hunter organizes the 1st South Carolina Regiment. It will later become the 33rd U. S. Colored Infantry.
July 1, 1862 United States public debt exceeds $500 million for the first time.
July 2, 1862 Earl Van Dorn is given command of the Military District of Mississippi Mississippi
  Earl Van Dorn
July 2, 1862 Lincoln issues a call for 300,000 3-year enlistments
  Abraham Lincoln
July 3, 1862 Sterling Price [CS] assumes command of the Army of the West
  Sterling Price
July 4, 1862
August 1, 1862
John Hunt Morgan leads a Confederate raid into Kentucky
  John Hunt Morgan
July 6, 1862 Major General Ambrose Burnside leaves North Carolina by boat and heads to Harrison's Landing
  Ambrose Burnside
July 7, 1862 Battle of Hill's Plantation Arkansas
July 8, 1862 Abraham Lincoln visits with George McClellan at Harrison's Landing Virginia
  Abraham Lincoln
  George McClellan
July 9, 1862 John Hunt Morgan [CS] turns back federal troops and takes Tompkinsville Kentucky
  John Hunt Morgan
July 11, 1862 President Lincoln names Henry Halleck General-in-Chief
  Abraham Lincoln
  General-in-Chief, U. S. Army
  Henry Halleck
July 11, 1862 Ulysses S. Grant [US] ordered to assume command of the Army of the Tennessee, Army of the Mississippi and other western troops.
  Ulysses S. Grant
July 12, 1862 Congress authorizes the Medal of Honor for gallantry in action for non-commissioned officers and privates who "...distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldierlike qualities...". While the military is almost evenly split on the creation of the medal, politicians are strongly for it
July 12, 1862 John Hunt Morgan [CS] and his raiders seize Lebanon Kentucky
  John Hunt Morgan
July 12, 1862 Abraham Lincoln writes a letter to the Congressmen from the border states, warning them of his upcoming Emancipation Proclaimation. In it he states, "I do not speak of emancipation at once, but of a decision at once to emancipate gradually."
  Emancipation Proclamation
  The Emancipation of Slaves
July 13, 1862 Battle of Murphreesboro Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
July 13, 1862 Abraham Lincoln reads a draft of the Emancipation Proclaimation to Secretary of State William Seward and Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles, both strong abolitionists. Seward begins talking about the problems it will cause. Welles sits there dumbfounded
  Emancipation Proclamation
  The Emancipation of Slaves
  William Seward
July 14, 1862 Adjutant General Samuel Cooper [CS] imposes stricter adherence to conscription laws
July 14, 1862 U. S. Senate passes a bill creating West Virginia West Virginia
July 15, 1862 The C. S. S. Arkansas sails past the federal fleet on the Mississippi River with guns ablaze, destroying three ships. Mississippi
July 16, 1862
September 1, 1862
Northern Virginia Campaign - sometimes just called the Virginia Campaign. Virginia
  Northern Virginia Campaign
July 16, 1862 We are coming, Father Abraham, Three Hundred Thousand More appears in the Saturday Evening Post. Written by James Sloan, the marching song was intended to help raise volunteers following Lincoln's request to Congress that it increase the size of the army to 500,000 men
July 16, 1862 John Hunt Morgan wires Kirby Smith "Lexington and Frankfurt ... are garrisoned with Home Guard. The bridges between Cincinnati and Lexington have been destroyed. The whole country can be secured and 25,000 to 30,000 men with join you at once. Kentucky
  Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
  John Hunt Morgan
  E. Kirby Smith
July 17, 1862 Congress passes the Second Confiscation Act, or The Confiscation Act of 1862. This allows for confiscation of property from people who participate in the war
  The Emancipation of Slaves
July 21, 1862 In a tersely worded telegram, Braxton Bragg informs Jefferson Davis that he will move his army in force from Tupelo, Mississippi to Chattanooga, Tennessee Mississippi
Tennessee
  Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
  Braxton Bragg
  Jefferson Davis
July 22, 1862 President Lincoln presents his Emancipation Proclaimation to his Cabinet. William Seward recommends waiting until a victory to present it to the public.
  Abraham Lincoln
  William Seward
  Emancipation Proclamation
  The Emancipation of Slaves
  Salmon P. Chase
July 23, 1862 Moving his men by railroad from Tupelo, Mississippi, Braxton Bragg reappears in Chattanooga, Tennessee after a journey of more than 770 miles. It was the largest troop movement by rail during the war for the Confederates. Tennessee
  Braxton Bragg
  Army of Mississippi
July 23, 1862 Major General Henry Halleck becomes commanding general of the United States Army
  Henry Halleck
July 28, 1862 Railroads introduce the mail car, allowing mail to be sorted as a train travels
July 29, 1862 Naval assault on Ft. McAllister Georgia
  Fort McAllister
July 29, 1862 Belle Boyd was arrested as a Confederate spy. She was released a month later on lack of evidence.
July 30, 1862 The term Copperhead is used for the first time in writing by the Cincinnati Gazette. It was used to indicate people who would not admit they were Southern sympathizers, and "peace at any price" Democrats. People who did admit Southern sympathies were called "dough-heads." The paper used the term when refering to members of the Indiana Democratic Convention Ohio
Indiana
  copperhead
July 31, 1862 In response to Union General John Pope's order that citizens be shot as spies, Confederate President Jefferson Davis orders Pope's officers be held as felons and not prisoners-of-war.
  John Pope
July 31, 1862 Braxton Bragg [CS] and Kirby Smith [CS] meet in Chattanooga to agree on strategy against the Army of the Ohio.
  Braxton Bragg
  E. Kirby Smith
  Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
January, 1862 May, 1862 September, 1862
February, 1862 June, 1862 October, 1862
March, 1862 July, 1862 November, 1862
April, 1862 August, 1862 December, 1862

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