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The Civil War in Tennessee
Battle of Wauhatchie
Cracker Line
Fort Henry and Fort Donelson
Battle of Nashville
Battles for Chattanooga
Benjamin Franklin Cheatham
Fall of Nashville, February, 1862
Nathan Bedford Forrest
Battle of Fort Sanders
Andrew Johnson
Siege of Knoxville
Battle of Missionary Ridge
Nashville Convention of 1850
Stone's River
Stone's River
Tullahoma Campaign
October 27, 1859 The Louisville and Nashville Railroad makes its first trip between the two cities. Kentucky
Tennessee
December 8, 1860 Governor Isham Harris calls for a special session of the Tennessee legislature to consider secession Tennessee
January 7, 1861 Special Tennessee legislative session to consider holding a secession convention begins in Nashville Tennessee
January 19, 1861 Tennessee votes to hold a secessionist election. Tennessee
February 9, 1861 In a blow to the newly formed Confederacy, Tennessee voters reject the call for a secessionist convention, 68,262 to 59,499. Tennessee
April 15, 1861 Rejecting Lincoln's call for troops, Tennessee Governor Isham Harris orders a second session of the state legislature to consider the question of a secessionist convention. Tennessee
May 6, 1861 Tennessee votes to put the question of secession before the people in a popular referendum Tennessee
  Confederate Order of Secession
May 30, 1861 At a convention in Knoxville, a group of Unionists denounce Tennessee's secessionist actions. Tennessee
June 8, 1861 By a vote of 108,339 to 47,233, Tennessee decides to secede from the United States Tennessee
  Tennessee Ordinance of Secession
  Confederate Order of Secession
July 22, 1861 In a proclamation, Jefferson Davis accepts Tennessee as a member of the Confederacy Tennessee
  Jefferson Davis
August 1, 1861 Tennessee votes to adopt the Constitution of the Confederate States of America Tennessee
November 8, 1861
November 10, 1861
With the approach of a significant Union force in Kentucky, Unionists in East Tennessee revolted, burning railroad bridges to delay a Rebel advance. Tennessee
November 15, 1861 Second pro-Union rebellion in East Tennessee, centered in the Chattanooga area Tennessee
February 4, 1862 Confederate forces in Fort Heiman withdraw to Fort Henry, across the Tennessee River Tennessee
  Fort Henry and Fort Donelson
February 6, 1862 Battle of Fort Henry Kentucky
Tennessee
  Fort Henry and Fort Donelson
  Ulysses S. Grant
February 13, 1862
February 16, 1862
Battle of Ft. Donelson

General Ulysses S. Grant demands the unconditional surrender of the garrison from an old friend, Simon Bolivar Buckner
Tennessee
  Fort Henry and Fort Donelson
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  John Floyd
  John A. McClernand
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
  Gideon Pillow
  Lew Wallace
  Army of the Tennessee
  Fort Henry and Fort Donelson
  Simon Bolivar Buckner
February 23, 1862 Ulysses S. Grant orders William Nelson to advance on Nashville Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
  William 'Bull' Nelson
  Fall of Nashville, February, 1862
February 25, 1862 "Bull" Nelson enters Nashville, Tennessee, first Confederate state capital to fall into Union hands. Don Carlos Buell accepts the city's surrender. Nathan Bedford Forrest provides a rear guard for Hardee's Army of Central Kentucky as it withdraws to Alabama. Tennessee
  Don Carlos Buell
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
  William Hardee
  Fall of Nashville, February, 1862
  William 'Bull' Nelson
  John Floyd
  Civil War Firsts
March 3, 1862 Abraham Lincoln appoints Andrew Johnson to be military governor of Tennessee Tennessee
  Abraham Lincoln
  Andrew Johnson
March 17, 1862 Major General Lew Wallace and his division stop at Crump's Landing to destroy the tracks of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. Tennessee
  Battle of Shiloh
  Lew Wallace
  Lew Wallace at Shiloh
April 6, 1862
April 7, 1862
Battle of Pittsburg Landing [Union]
Battle of Shiloh [Confederate]

Ulysses S. Grant [US] defeats Albert Sidney Johnston [CS] in southwest Tennessee. P. G. T. Beauregard assumed command following Johnston's death

Confederate Losses
1,723 dead
8,012 wounded
959 missing
Union Losses
1,754 dead
8,408 wounded
2,885 missing
Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Sherman's Memoirs on Shiloh
  P. G. T. Beauregard
  Battle of Shiloh
  Braxton Bragg
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  Don Carlos Buell
  Albert Sidney Johnston
  John Breckinridge
  William Hardee
  William 'Bull' Nelson
  Lew Wallace
  Lew Wallace at Shiloh
  Army of the Tennessee
  James McPherson
  Army of Mississippi
April 6, 1862 On the first day of the battle of Shiloh/Pittsburg Landing, General Albert Sidney Johnston, commander of the Department of the West is killed while leading an advance against a Union position in a peach orchard. Tennessee
  Generals Who Died In the Civil War
  Albert Sidney Johnston
April 8, 1862 Following a disasterous second day at Pittsburg Landing, Confederates withdraw to Corinth, Mississippi Tennessee
  Battle of Shiloh
  Army of Mississippi
May 10, 1862 Federal mortar boats, shelling Fort Pillow, are attacked by a makeshift Confederate fleet. The U. S. responds in force, with ironclads. Although the 8 Confederate boats manage to sink 2 ironclads (the Cincinnati and Mound City) the battle of Plum Run Bend or Plum Point ended when the Rebels withdrew to Fort Pillow Tennessee
June 4, 1862 Confederates evacuate Fort Pillow, now a lone garrison on the Mississippi in northern Tennessee Tennessee
June 6, 1862 Following a naval battle where Union rams and gunboats easily defeated a makeshift Confederate navy, Federal forces occupy Memphis Tennessee
  Queen of the West
June 6, 1862 U. S. Brigadier General Jeremiah Sullivan captures Jackson, Tennessee. Tennessee
June 18, 1862 Union forces capture the Cumberland Gap Virginia
Kentucky
Tennessee
June 21, 1862 Ulysses S. Grant ordered to Memphis to become district commander Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
July 13, 1862 Battle of Murphreesboro Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
July 21, 1862 In a tersely worded telegram, Braxton Bragg informs Jefferson Davis that he will move his army in force from Tupelo, Mississippi to Chattanooga, Tennessee Mississippi
Tennessee
  Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
  Braxton Bragg
  Jefferson Davis
July 23, 1862 Moving his men by railroad from Tupelo, Mississippi, Braxton Bragg reappears in Chattanooga, Tennessee after a journey of more than 770 miles. It was the largest troop movement by rail during the war for the Confederates. Tennessee
  Braxton Bragg
  Army of Mississippi
August 16, 1862 Carter Stevenson [CS] appears at the entrance to the Cumberland Gap in eastern Tennessee. Kentucky
Tennessee
  E. Kirby Smith
  Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
August 21, 1862 Braxton Bragg crosses the Tennessee River at Chattanooga. Tennessee
  Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
  Army of Mississippi
August 28, 1862 Braxton Bragg [CS] leaves from north of Chattanooga, heading to join Kirby Smith in Kentucky Tennessee
  Braxton Bragg
  Army of Tennessee
  Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
  Army of Mississippi
September 1, 1862 Battle of Britton's Lane Tennessee
October 7, 1862 Battle of Lavernge Tennessee
October 19, 1862
October 23, 1862
Bragg moves south through the Cumberland Gap, essentially escaping the Army of the Ohio Tennessee
Kentucky
  Braxton Bragg
  Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
November 4, 1862 Moving south, east of the Mississippi, Ulysses S. Grant enters La Grange and Grand Junction. Tennessee
  First Vicksburg Campaign
  Ulysses S. Grant
December 7, 1862 John Hunt Morgan captures a federal garrison in Hartsville, killing and wounding 1000 before 1800 men surrendered Tennessee
  John Hunt Morgan
December 20, 1862 U. S. 15th Corps under William Tecumseh Sherman boards transports at Memphis to sail down the Mississippi to Chickasaw Bayou. Ulysses S. Grant called off a supporting campaign over land because of continued Rebel raids Tennessee
  First Vicksburg Campaign
  William Tecumseh Sherman
December 28, 1862 Battle of Elk Fork Tennessee
December 31, 1862 Battle of Parker's Cross Roads

Near Lexington General Nathan Bedford Forrest [CS] tries to break through a federal line after successful raids on Grant's supply lines and communications. As he begins to drive the Union troops back he is attacked from behind, loosing 300 men.
Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
December 31, 1862 Battle of Stone's River [US]
Battle of Murfreesboro [CS]

Braxton Bragg forces William Rosecrans to retreat, but Rosecrans returns to defeat Bragg on January 2, 1863.

Union 13,249

Confederate 10,266
Tennessee
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  Braxton Bragg
  William S. Rosecrans
  George Thomas
  John Breckinridge
  Army of the Cumberland
  Philip Sheridan
  Stone's River
March 4, 1863
March 5, 1863
Battle of Spring Hill
Battle of Unionville

Confederate Cavalry under Earl Van Dorn and Nathan Bedford Forrest drive Union Cavalry off on the 4th, then surround and engage the remaining infantry. After heavy fighting on the 5th, the Union garrison surrenders.
Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
  Earl Van Dorn
April 11, 1863 Col. Abel Streight leaves Nashville, Tennessee on a raid of Rome, GA Georgia
Tennessee
  Raid on Rome, Georgia
April 27, 1863 Major General Simon Bolivar Buckner assumes command of the Department of East Tennessee. Tennessee
  Simon Bolivar Buckner
May 25, 1863 Clement Vallandigham is banished to the Confederacy for his "pro-Confederate remarks." The exchange took place at Murfreesboro, Tennessee Ohio
Tennessee
  Clement Vallandigham
June 23, 1863 Army of the Cumberland begins the Tullahoma Campaign against the Army of Tennessee Tennessee
Georgia
  Tullahoma Campaign
  Army of the Cumberland
  Leonidas Polk
  Braxton Bragg
  William S. Rosecrans
July 7, 1863 Braxton Bragg completes his withdrawal from Tullahoma to Chattanooga Tennessee
  Braxton Bragg
  Tullahoma Campaign
September 2, 1863 Ambrose Burnside occupies Knoxville Tennessee
  Ambrose Burnside
September 9, 1863 Brigadier General John W. Frazier [CS] surrenders his men guarding the Cumberland Gap Kentucky
Tennessee
September 9, 1863 Federal troops enter Chattanooga, Tennessee following its evacuation by the Army of Tennessee Tennessee
  Chickamauga Campaign
  Braxton Bragg
  Army of Tennessee
  Army of the Cumberland
September 30, 1863
October 17, 1863
Gen. Joseph Wheeler [CS] raids Federal positions north and east of Chattanooga. Tennessee
  Battles for Chattanooga
October 5, 1863 Joe Wheeler cuts the railroad between Nashville and Chattanooga at Stones River. The loss is a major blow to the besieged Army of the Cumberland. Tennessee
  Battles for Chattanooga
  Army of the Cumberland
October 21, 1863 Ulysses S. Grant leaves Bridgeport, AL to assume command of the troops in Chattanooga. The only road in a muddy wash with a horrible stench from the dead mules lying on either side. This was the road Rosecrans was using to supply his troops. Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Battles for Chattanooga
October 23, 1863 Ulysess S. Grant arrives in Chattanooga, Tennessee and immediately begins working on securing a better supply line to the city. Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Battles for Chattanooga
October 24, 1863 General Grant, in Chattanooga, approves the plan of "Baldy" Smith to open a "Cracker Line" between Chattanooga and the railhead at Stevenson, Alabama Alabama
Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Battles for Chattanooga
  William Farrar Smith
  Cracker Line
October 28, 1863
October 29, 1863
Battle of Wauhatchie

In a rare nighttime assault, James Longstreet [CS] battles John Geary [US] just west of Lookout Mountain
Tennessee
  Battles for Chattanooga
  James Longstreet
  Battle of Wauhatchie
October 28, 1863 General O. O. Howard reaches Brown's Ferry, Tennessee from Stevenson, AL, opening the famous Cracker Line Tennessee
  Battles for Chattanooga
October 29, 1863 Jefferson Davis grants Nathan Bedford Forrest's request for an independent command in north Mississippi and west Tennessee. This frees him from Braxton Bragg. Mississippi
Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
  Braxton Bragg
November 4, 1863 Braxton Bragg orders James Longstreet to Knoxville to operate against Ambrose Burnside. Longstreet is the last of the generals that complained to Jefferson Davis about Bragg. Tennessee
  Braxton Bragg
  James Longstreet
  Siege of Knoxville
November 15, 1863 Moving east from the Mississippi, General William Tecumseh Sherman arrives in Stevenson, Alabama with four divisions. Sherman then confers with Grant in Chattanooga. Alabama
Tennessee
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  Ulysses S. Grant
November 16, 1863 Battle of Campbell's Station, Knoxville

Ambrose Burnside [US] withdraws following an attack by James Longstreet [CS].
Tennessee
  Ambrose Burnside
  James Longstreet
  Siege of Knoxville
November 17, 1863
December 4, 1863
Siege of Knoxville Tennessee
  James Longstreet
  Ambrose Burnside
  Siege of Knoxville
November 22, 1863 Completely unaware of the federal build-up in Chattanooga, Braxton Bragg detaches Buckner's Corps and orders him to join Longstreet in Knoxville. Tennessee
  Braxton Bragg
  Simon Bolivar Buckner
November 23, 1863 Action at Orchard Knob, Chattanooga Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Battles for Chattanooga
  George Thomas
  Philip Sheridan
November 24, 1863 Battle of Lookout Mountain
Battle Above the Clouds

Joseph Hooker [US] engages forces under Carter Stevenson [CS] on the slopes of Lookout Mountain
Tennessee
Georgia
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Battles for Chattanooga
  Joseph Hooker
  Braxton Bragg
November 25, 1863 Battle of Missionary Ridge, Chattanooga

Three Union armies attacked the Army of Tennessee atop Missionary Ridge, east of downtown Chattanooga. Patrick Cleburne stopped William Tecumseh Sherman from the north, although outnumbered 10 to 1. Joe Hooker was seriously delayed by burnt bridges and failed to hit the southern end of Bragg's line near Rossville, Georgia. Thomas' Army of the Cumberland struck the center, breaking Bragg's line and forcing a retreat. Sheridan, ordered to pursue, was stopped dead in his tracks by William Hardee's rear guard action.
Tennessee
Georgia
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Battles for Chattanooga
  Braxton Bragg
  John Breckinridge
  George Thomas
  Philip Sheridan
  Army of the Cumberland
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  Patrick Cleburne
  Joseph Hooker
  William Hardee
  Army of Tennessee
November 28, 1863 Ulysses S. Grant orders William Tecumseh Sherman to advance on Knoxville and relieve Ambrose Burnside Tennessee
  Ambrose Burnside
  Siege of Knoxville
  Ulysses S. Grant
  William Tecumseh Sherman
November 29, 1863 Battle of Fort Sanders (earlier known as Ft. Loudon or Loudoun) Tennessee
  Battle of Fort Sanders
  Lafayette McLaws
  Ambrose Burnside
  Siege of Knoxville
November 30, 1863 President Davis accepts Bragg's resignation and appoints William Hardee in temporary command of the Army of Tennessee Tennessee
  Jefferson Davis
  Braxton Bragg
  William Hardee
  Army of Tennessee
December 3, 1863 James Longstreet begins a two-day withdrawal from Knoxville to Greeneville following the Siege of Knoxville. Tennessee
  James Longstreet
  Siege of Knoxville
December 6, 1863 William Tecumseh Sherman enters Knoxville, formally ending the siege Tennessee
  Siege of Knoxville
  William Tecumseh Sherman
December 9, 1863
December 14, 1863
Battle of Bean's Station

Federal forces probe Longstreet's lines near his winter camp. After several days of heavy skirmishing, Longstreet struck the Union line on Dec. 14, driving Brigadier General James Shackleford back about 1.5 miles before he made a stand. Union forces withdrew that evening.
Tennessee
  Siege of Knoxville
  James Longstreet
January 26, 1864 Local elections are permitted in Tennessee where the federal government feels it is in control of the state Tennessee
March 12, 1864 Lt. General Ulysses S. Grant assumes command of the armies of the United States. Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
March 16, 1864 Nathan Bedford Forrest begins a raid into West Tennessee and Kentucky Kentucky
Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
March 17, 1864 William Tecumseh Sherman, meeting with Grant in Nashville, is promoted to Military Division of the Mississippi commanding the Department of the Ohio, Department of the Tennessee, Department of the Cumberland and the Department of the Arkansas. Major General James McPherson is promoted to Sherman's old position, commander of the Army of the Tennessee Tennessee
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  Ulysses S. Grant
  James McPherson
  Army of the Tennessee
March 24, 1864 Nathan Bedford Forrest seizes Union City Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
April 12, 1864 Battle of Fort Pillow

Nathan Bedford Forrest [CS] defeats [US]. Following the defeat, Forrest's men massacre most of the occupants of the fort. They were black.
Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
June 2, 1864 Ordered to pursue and destroy General Nathan Bedford Forrest, General John Sturgis leaves Memphis with a force of 8,100 men Tennessee
  Brice's Crossroads
August 21, 1864 Forrest liberates Memphis

Almost 2,000 Confederates occupied Memphis for a few hours during the day, nearly capturing Major Generals Stephen Hurlbut and C. C. Washburn. The raid forced troops operating in the area to withdraw to Memphis, giving Forrest free reign to raid William Tecumseh Sherman's supply lines
Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
September 4, 1864 John Hunt Morgan is shot dead by federal troops fleeing the home of a woman who had betrayed him (Greenville, Tennessee) Tennessee
  John Hunt Morgan
September 5, 1864 Tennessee Unionists meet in Nashville to restart the state government and plan participation in national elections that fall. Tennessee
November 4, 1864
November 5, 1864
Battle of Johnsonville

Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry and two captured Union boats move up the Tennessee River to Johnsonville and attacked the Union supply depot there causing major damage
Tennessee
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
November 30, 1864 Battle of Franklin Tennessee
  John Bell Hood
  Nashville Campaign
December 15, 1864
December 16, 1864
Battle of Nashville Tennessee
  John Bell Hood
  George Thomas
  Nashville Campaign
February 22, 1865 Voters approve a new constitution, including the abolition of slavery, in Tennessee Tennessee
  abolition
March 4, 1865 "Parson" Brownlow is elected the first post-war governor of Tennessee Tennessee
December 24, 1865 The Ku Klux Klan is organized at the law offices of Thomas M. Jones in Pulaski, Tennessee. The name derives from the Greek word kykos (circle) and was suggested by John B. Kennedy, who anglicized it to Ku Klux. James R. Crowe added the word Klan because of the predominant Scottish-Irish population of the area Tennessee
April 2, 1866 The United States declares that a state of peace exists with Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia Alabama
Georgia
Mississippi
Tennessee
South Carolina
Virginia
Florida
North Carolina
Arkansas
Louisiana
July 19, 1866 Tennessee ratifies the 14th Amendment. This quick ratification meant Tennessee would not suffer under 2nd Reconstruction Tennessee
  14th Amendment

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