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The Civil War in Missouri
Battle of Belmont
January 8, 1818 Missouri petitions for statehood Missouri
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
March 16, 1818 Missouri's petition for statehood is presented to the U. S. House. It is not considered before the end of the session. Missouri
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
December 18, 1818 Missouri petitions the U. S. House to be admitted to the Union for the second time. Missouri
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
February 13, 1819 Bill permitting Missouri to draw up a state constitution to be admitted to the Union comes to the floor of the House. Missouri
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
February 17, 1819 After several days of sharp debate the House passes the Missouri statehood bill including both parts of the Tallmadge Amendment, marking the first legislation demanding the abolition of slavery. The act is sent to the Senate where the bill is never voted on. Missouri
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
  Civil War Firsts
  abolition
March 1, 1820 Missouri Compromise moves out of conference committee and to the floor of the House and Senate for debate. Maine
Missouri
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
March 3, 1820 Maine admitted to the U. S. as a free state, Missouri admitted to the U. S. as a slave state. Missouri
Maine
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
July 1, 1820 At a convention in St. Louis, Missouri passes a pro-slave state constitution. Missouri
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
August 10, 1821 Missouri is admitted to the Union Missouri
  Missouri Compromise (Compromise of 1820)
  Causes of the Civil War
April 9, 1837 Lieutenant Robert E. Lee is ordered to St. Louis to rework the Mississippi River commercial channel. Missouri
  Robert E. Lee
December 6, 1837 Robert E. Lee submits a plan to save the port of St. Louis Missouri
  Robert E. Lee
January 11, 1861 Federal soldiers seize buildings in St. Louis to prevent them from falling into Rebel hands Missouri
March 21, 1861 Missouri secessionist convention adjourns having voted 98-1 against secession Missouri
  Confederate Order of Secession
April 25, 1861 In a daring nighttime operation Illinois troops steam from Alton to St. Louis and remove 10,000 muskets with the help of federal troops in the armory Missouri
Illinois
May 10, 1861 Nathaniel Lyons [US] takes control of St. Louis to end rioting, seizing Camp Jackson (Confederate militia) and 1200 1855 Springfield Rifles Missouri
  1855 Springfield Rifle
May 15, 1861 Nathaniel Lyons [US] occupies Jefferson City, capital of Missouri Missouri
May 21, 1861 Missouri declares its neutrality in the Civil War Missouri
  Confederate Order of Secession
May 21, 1861 Sterling Price signs an agreement with William Harney, essentially handing Missouri over to federal forces. Missouri
  Sterling Price
May 24, 1861 Sterling Price refuses to disband his troops Missouri
  Sterling Price
June 17, 1861 Nathaniel Lyons captures Boonville Missouri
July 11, 1861 Sterling Price, Confederate governor Claiborne Jackson, Nathaniel Lyon, and Francis Blair meet at Planters' House in St. Louis to discuss a truce. Lyon was quoted as saying "This means war" after the talks end abruptly Missouri
  Sterling Price
August 10, 1861 Battle of Wilson's Creek [US]
Battle of Springfield [CS]

Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon [US] is killed in the Confederate victory
Missouri
  Generals Who Died In the Civil War
  Sterling Price
August 28, 1861 Ulysses S. Grant is given command of federal forces in Southern Illinois and Southeastern Missouri Missouri
Illinois
  Ulysses S. Grant
August 30, 1861 John C. Fremont declares martial law in Missouri and frees slaves of Missouri Confederates. Missouri
  John C. Fremont
  The Emancipation of Slaves
September 11, 1861 President Lincoln orders John C. Fremont to rescind his order freeing some slaves in Missouri and issue a new order conforming to the Confiscation Act passed by Congress Missouri
  Abraham Lincoln
  John C. Fremont
  The Emancipation of Slaves
  Committee on the Conduct of the War
September 12, 1861
September 20, 1861
Battle of Lexington

Sterling Price, with 18,000 men, lays siege to Lexington, Missouri, with a federal force of 3.600 under Colonel James Mulligan. After fighting intensified on September 19, Mulligan surrendered on the 20th.
Missouri
  Sterling Price
November 2, 1861 President Lincoln relieves John C. Frémont from duty. Missouri
  John C. Fremont
November 7, 1861 Battle of Belmont

U. S. Grant [US] defeats Gideon Pillow [CS]. Grant's men are then routed by B. F. Cheatham [CS].

Losses:
U. S. 607
C. S. 641
Missouri
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Gideon Pillow
  Battle of Belmont
  Benjamin Franklin Cheatham
  Leonidas Polk
November 19, 1861 Henry W. Halleck assumes command of Union forces in Missouri Missouri
  Henry Halleck
March 3, 1862 General John Pope lays siege to New Madrid Missouri
  John Pope
March 14, 1862 Following a two week siege, federals under John Pope take New Madrid. Missouri
  John Pope
April 7, 1862 Island No. 10, in the Mississippi River downstream from New Madrid, is captured. More than 5,000 Confederates are taken prisoner Missouri
  John Pope
August 6, 1862 Battle of Kirksville Missouri
April 17, 1863 Brigadier General John Marmaduke [CS] leaves Arkansas and enters Missouri on a raid Missouri
August 19, 1863 300 men under the command of William Quantrill, popularly known as Quantrill's Raiders, leave Blackwater Creek, Missouri heading for Lawrence, Kansas Kansas
Missouri
August 21, 1863 Quantrill's Raiders, now numbering more 400, attack Lawrence, Kansas, killing every male they could find who was old enough to carry a gun (a total of 183 men). One they missed was U. S. Senator James H. Lane, who hid in a cornfield in his nightshirt. Quantrill's men burned the town following the raid Kansas
Missouri
August 25, 1863 In response to Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas, Brigadier General Thomas Ewing [US] orders civilians out of their homes in 3 Missouri counties (Jackson, Cass and Bates) and parts of a fourth (Vernon). Union soldiers burn the homes, barns and crops. Missouri
January 11, 1864 The 13th Amendment (ending slavery) to the Constitution is proposed by Senator John B. Henderson of Missouri. Missouri
  The Emancipation of Slaves
January 22, 1864 William S. Rosecrans is ordered to take command of the Department of Missouri, replacing John Schofield Missouri
  William S. Rosecrans
January 23, 1864 Trade restrictions for Missouri and Kentucky are lifted Kentucky
Missouri
September 27, 1864 A small Confederate force under "Bloody" Bill Anderson attacks Centralia, Missouri. 24 Union soldiers are killed in the town and another 116 are killed in an ambush. Missouri
October 23, 1864 Battle of Westport Missouri
January 25, 1867 Missouri ratifies the 14th Amendment Missouri
  14th Amendment
January 10, 1869 [circa] At Fort Cobb, in response to Comanche Chief Toch-a-way's remark "Me good Indian," Phil Sheridan replies, "The only good Indian is a dead Indian." Missouri
  Philip Sheridan
June 27, 1876
June 29, 1876
Reform New York governor Samuel Tilden easily won the Democratic nomination for President at the convention in St. Louis Missouri
  Election of 1876
  Democratic Party
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