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The Civil War in Maryland
James Archer
Roger B. Taney
Baltimore Riot of 1861
Maryland and Secession
Antietam
Confederate Order of Secession
September 11, 1786
September 14, 1786
The Annapolis Convention (in Maryland) backs calling a Constitutional Convention to begin in May, 1787 in Philadelphia Maryland
Virginia
New Jersey
Delaware
New York
Pennsylvania
February 15, 1817 [circa] Frederick Douglass born near Easton, Talbot County (may be 1818) Maryland
  Frederick Douglass
December 12, 1831 National Republicans hold a convention in Baltimore. They nominate Henry Clay unanimously on the first ballot to run for President. John Sergeant of Pennsylvania is chosen as his running mate Maryland
  Henry Clay
  Election of 1832
May 21, 1832 Democratic-Republicans hold a convention in Baltimore, nominating Andrew Jackson for President and Martin Van Buren for Vice-President. Maryland
  Election of 1832
  Andrew Jackson
  Martin Van Buren
  Democratic Party
May 20, 1835
May 22, 1835
Democrats hold their Presidential nominating convention in Baltimore more than a year before the election Maryland
  Election of 1836
  Democratic Party
September 3, 1838 Frederick Douglass travels from Baltimore to New York under an assumed named, escaping slavery Maryland
New York
  Frederick Douglass
May 8, 1840 Democratic National Convention in Baltimore nominates Martin Van Buren for President. Maryland
  Martin Van Buren
  Election of 1840
  Democratic Party
May 27, 1844 The Democratic National Convention is held in Baltimore. On the ninth ballot the delegates nominate James Polk to run for President and George Dallas for Vice-President Maryland
  Election of 1844
  Democratic Party
May 22, 1848
May 25, 1848
In a convention in Baltimore, Maryland, Democrats nominate Lewis Cass for President and William Butler for Vice President Maryland
  Election of 1848
  Democratic Party
June 12, 1852 On the 49th ballot, the Democratic Convention in Baltimore elects Franklin Pierce of New Hampshire Maryland
  Democratic Party
June 2, 1856
June 6, 1856
Democratic Convention - After 14 ballots, sitting President Franklin Pierce withdraws his name from nomination. Stephen Douglas withdraws at the end of the 16th ballot. James Buchanan is nominated by acclamation Maryland
  Stephen A. Douglas
  Election of 1856
  James Buchanan
  Franklin Pierce
  Democratic Party
October 16, 1859 John Brown takes the armory at Harpers Ferry Maryland
  Causes of the Civil War
  John Brown
  Harpers Ferry
  Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
May 8, 1860
May 9, 1860
The Constitution Union Party, meeting in Baltimore, creates a platform taken heavily from the U. S. Constitution and selects John Bell of Tennessee for President and Edward Everett of Massachusetts for Vice-President. It represents southern Whigs and Know-nothings (American Party). Sometimes called the Bell-Union Party Maryland
  The Election of 1860
June 18, 1860
June 23, 1860
The Democrats reconvene in Baltimore to select a nominee, but Douglas can't make the necessary 2/3 majority until the anti-Douglas delegates leave on June 22 and the floor rules are changed to require 2/3 vote of the members present. On June 23rd the Convention nominates Stephen Douglas and Herschal V. Johnson Maryland
  The Election of 1860
  1860 Democratic National Convention
  Stephen A. Douglas
  1860 Democratic Party Platform
  Democratic Party
January 6, 1861 Maryland's pro-Union governor denounces secession in a speech to the residents of the state. Maryland
February 18, 1861
February 19, 1861
Maryland convenes a secessionist convention in Baltimore to consider its options. The convention ends without a declaration of secession Maryland
  Maryland and Secession
February 22, 1861
February 23, 1861
Under the watchful eyes of Allan Pinkerton, Abraham Lincoln travels in secrecy to Washington, D. C. Pinkerton had been worried about the trip through Baltimore, Maryland, a Southern-leaning city Maryland
  Abraham Lincoln
  Washington D. C.
April 19, 1861 Southern sympathizers in Baltimore cut telegraph lines and bridges to Washington, D. C. While passing through the city, the 6th Massachusetts Regiment is attacked. They open fire on a crowd. When the dust settles, three soldiers and one civilian were dead, the first casualties during fighting in the Civil War. Maryland
  Civil War Firsts
  Washington D. C.
  Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
  Maryland and Secession
April 22, 1861 Maryland Governor Thomas Holliday Hicks calls a session of the Maryland legislature to consider secession Maryland
  Maryland and Secession
April 29, 1861 The Maryland legislature votes 53-13 against convening a secessionist convention, dashing the hopes of a sizable pro-South group, but did not vote to end the session Maryland
  Maryland and Secession
May 12, 1861 Benjamin Butler takes control of Federal Hill and threatens to fire on downtown Baltimore if Southern sympathizers protest. Maryland
  Benjamin Butler
May 28, 1861 Confederates seize the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from Point of Rocks to Cumberland Maryland
West Virginia
  Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
July 2, 1861 General Robert Patterson crosses the Potomac at Williamsport, Maryland and moves towards Harpers Ferry. Virginia
Maryland
  Harpers Ferry
August 7, 1861 The Maryland legislature adjourns without seceding, but votes to reconvene in September Maryland
September 11, 1861 Abraham Lincoln has Secretary of War Simon Cameron order the arrest of Maryland legislators who are openly pro-South. Maryland
  Maryland and Secession
December 7, 1861 Stonewall Jackson destroys the West Virginia side of Dam Number 5 on the Potomac River, disrupting the C&O Canal and impacting the Union's ability to repair the B&O Railroad. Maryland
West Virginia
  Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
  Attack on Dam Number 5
  Stonewall Jackson
September 5, 1862 Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia enters Maryland Maryland
  Robert E. Lee
  Antietam
  Army of Northern Virginia
September 6, 1862 Army of Northern Virginia enters Frederick Maryland
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Antietam
September 12, 1862
September 15, 1862
Battle of Harpers Ferry

Stonewall Jackson takes 12,000 prisoners
Maryland
Virginia
  Stonewall Jackson
  Battle of Harpers Ferry
  Harpers Ferry
  Lafayette McLaws
  Antietam
September 13, 1862 George McClellan's men find a copy of Lee's Special Orders No. 191 issued on September 9, detailing deployment of Confederate troops during the initial phase of the invasion of Maryland, including the attack on Harper's Ferry Maryland
  Battle of Harpers Ferry
  Robert E. Lee
  George McClellan
  Special Orders No. 191
  Antietam
September 14, 1862 Battle of Turners Gap
Battle of Fox's Gap
Battle of South Mountain

Battle of Cramptons Gap

George McClellan reacts to finding Special Order No. 191 with attacks on the gaps in South Mountain, forcing Lee to reorganize at Sharpsburg
Maryland
  George McClellan
  Special Orders No. 191
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Antietam
  William B. Franklin
  Rutherford B. Hayes
September 14, 1862 Brigadier General Samuel Garland [CS] is mortally wounded during the Battle of Fox's Gap, dying later that day. Later that day, Major General Jesse Reno [US] is also mortally wounded a few feet from the spot where Garland fell. Maryland
  Generals Who Died In the Civil War
  Samuel Garland
September 17, 1862 Battle of Sharpsburg (Confederate)
Battle of Antietam (Union)
Army of the Potomac under McClellan [US] defeats the Army of Northern Virginia under Lee [CS], resulting in the bloodiest day in American history.

Union losses:12,401 men
2,108 dead
9,540 wounded
753 missing
Confederate losses:10, 406
1,546 dead
7,752 wounded
1,108 missing
Maryland
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  Robert E. Lee
  George McClellan
  Stonewall Jackson
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Army of the Potomac
  George Meade
  Lafayette McLaws
  Antietam
  Edwin Vose Sumner
September 19, 1862
September 20, 1862
Skirmishes at Shepherdstown, Ashby's Gap, Williamsport, and Hagerstown, as Confederates under A. P. Hill covered the retreat of the Army of Northern Virginia from Sharpsburg. Lee would keep a heavy cavalry presence in the area until October. Maryland
Virginia
West Virginia
  Antietam
  A. P. Hill
  Army of Northern Virginia
October 2, 1862 Abraham Lincoln arrives at George McClellan's headquarters in Sharpsburg Maryland
  Abraham Lincoln
October 9, 1862
October 12, 1862
J. E. B. Stuart "rides around McClellan's Army" for a second time Maryland
Pennsylvania
  J. E. B. Stuart
July 14, 1863 Battle of Falling Waters Maryland
June 7, 1864 The Republican (National Union) Convention opens in Baltimore, Maryland. Maryland
  Election of 1864
  Republican Party
June 8, 1864 The Republican National Convention nominates Abraham Lincoln to run for President and Andrew Johnson to run for Vice-President Maryland
  Election of 1864
  Abraham Lincoln
  Republican Party
July 9, 1864 Battle of the Monocacy

General Lew Wallace [US] with an irregular force of 6,000 men is routed by Jubal Early's 10,000 man battle-hardened division
Maryland
  Jubal Early's Raid on Washington D. C.
  Jubal Anderson Early
  Lew Wallace
March 23, 1867 Maryland rejects the 14th Amendment Maryland
  14th Amendment
April 4, 1959 Maryland ratifies the 14th Amendment Maryland
  14th Amendment
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