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The Civil War in Kansas
Kansas-Nebraska Act [Full Text]
Bleeding Kansas
John Brown
Lecompton Constitution
March 7, 1827 Colonel Henry Leavenworth ordered west to establish a fort in the area of present-day Kansas Kansas
May 8, 1827 Leavenworth reports he has established a fort on the Missouri River, the first U. S. fort in present-day Kansas Kansas
June 26, 1846 Dragoons and volunteers leave Fort Leavenworth and head west to reinforce California and seize San Diego and Los Angeles. They return from a successful mission in August, 1847 Kansas
  Mexican American War
May 26, 1854 Joint Committee of Congress approves the Kansas-Nebraska Act Kansas
  Kansas-Nebraska Act [Full Text]
  Kansas-Nebraska Act
May 30, 1854 President Franklin Pierce signs the Kansas-Nebraska Act into law. Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
  Causes of the Civil War
  Kansas-Nebraska Act
  Franklin Pierce
July 7, 1854 Franklin Pierce swears Andrew Reeder in as territorial governor of Kansas in Washington, D. C. Kansas
  Franklin Pierce
August 1, 1854 City of Lawrence, Kansas is founded Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
November 29, 1854 Pro-slavery forces from Missouri cross the Kansas border and elect John Whitfield, a pro-slavery candidate as territorial delegate to Washington. More than 1,700 illegal votes were registered Kansas
March 3, 1855 Franklin Pierce removes Andrew Reeder as territorial governor of Kansas Kansas
March 30, 1855 Kansas elects its first territorial legislature. Pro-slavery Missourians cross the border into Kansas to vote against Freestate candidates Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
May 22, 1855 Kansas hold a supplimentary election for districts where voting on March 30, 1855 was disputed. In the 6 districts, 10 Freesoilers and 3 pro-slavery men were elected Kansas
July 2, 1855 The Kansas legislature, meeting in Pawnee and controlled by pro-slave forces, expels all "Free-staters" and moves the legislature to Shawnee Mission, near the Missouri state line Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
August 14, 1855 In response to their explusion by the pro-slavery forces in the Kansas legislature, free-soilers hold a convention in Lawrence. Kansas
September 5, 1855 Free-staters meet in Big Springs, Kansas to elect representatives to a constitutional convention in Topeka Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
October 23, 1855 Topeka Convention convened Kansas
November 2, 1855 Topeka Constitution adopted by the Free Staters Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
January 24, 1856 Franklin Pierce rejects the Topeka Constitution because the vote did not constitute "...the body politic" Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
  Franklin Pierce
March 24, 1856 President Franklin Pierce sends all "...documents touching the affairs of the Territory of Kansas" between the dates of January 1, 1855 and June 30, 1855 to the House of Representatives to comply with an earlier request Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
  Franklin Pierce
May 19, 1856 Charles Sumner begins his "Crime against Kansas" speech, which concludes tomorrow Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
  Sumner and Brooks
  Preston S. Brooks
  Charles Sumner
  Kansas becomes a state
May 21, 1856 Samuel Jones, a pro-slavery sheriff leads a band of border ruffians on a raid against Lawrence, Kansas Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
May 24, 1856
May 25, 1856
Pottawatomie Massacre - John Brown kills five pro-slavers along this Kansas Creek Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
  John Brown
June 2, 1856 Battle of Blackjack, near Baldwin in Douglas County Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
July 4, 1856 Under direct orders from President Franklin Pierce, Edwin Vose Sumner leads 200 infantrymen into Topeka, Kansas, unlimbers his artillery and informs the freestaters they may not hold a convention. Kansas
  Edwin Vose Sumner
  Franklin Pierce
  Bleeding Kansas
August 16, 1856 Battle of Fort Titus Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
September 15, 1856 Battle of Hickory Point Kansas
July 29, 1857 Col. Edwin Sumner attacks 300 mounted Cheyenne at Solomon's Ford in Kansas. Jeb Stuart is wounded in the attack. Kansas
  Edwin Vose Sumner
  J. E. B. Stuart
September 7, 1857 The Lecompton (KS) Convention, a pro-slave constitutional convention convenes Kansas
  Lecompton Constitution
October 5, 1857
October 6, 1857
Kansas free-staters win control of the legislative branch in elections Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
October 19, 1857 Proslavery factions reconvene the Lecompton Constitutional Convention to draft a document Kansas
  Lecompton Constitution
November 7, 1857 The Lecompton (KS) Constitutional Convention adopts a pro-slavery constitution and approves a ratification election on December 21, 1857 Kansas
  Lecompton Constitution
December 2, 1857 "Free-staters" take control of the Kansas legislature following their election in October Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
December 7, 1857 Free-state congress calls for a third option in voting on the Lecompton Constitution - rejection of the document. Kansas
  Lecompton Constitution
December 8, 1857 James Buchanan announces he supports the Lecompton Constitution in a message to the Senate Kansas
  James Buchanan
  Lecompton Constitution
December 9, 1857 Breaking with the Democrats, Stephen Douglas announces he is against the Lecompton Constitution Kansas
  Stephen A. Douglas
  Lecompton Constitution
  Democratic Party
December 17, 1857 The Free-state legislature adds a third option to the Lecompton ratification vote: reject the Lecompton Constitution. This is not on the ballot of Dec. 21 Kansas
  Lecompton Constitution
December 21, 1857 Lecompton Constitution ratification vote. Voters were not voting for the Constitution, rather they were voting for the Constitution with slavery or the Constitution without slavery. With freestaters waiting for the vote on January 4, pro-slavery factions easily carry the vote Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
  Lecompton Constitution
January 4, 1858 A second ratification vote is held for the Lecompton Constitution. The Free-staters reject the Lecompton Constitution. Kansas
  Lecompton Constitution
February 2, 1858 President Buchanan reiterates his support of the Lecompton Constitution to the Senate, which accepts the document 32-25 over the objections of Stephen Douglas Kansas
  James Buchanan
  Lecompton Constitution
  English Bill
  Stephen A. Douglas
March 23, 1858 Free-stater convention convenes in Leavenworth, Kansas Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
April 3, 1858 Leavenworth Constitution is adopted by a Free-stater constitutional convention. It is opposed by the Buchanan administration because it does not represent the people of the state Kansas
  James Buchanan
  Kansas becomes a state
April 23, 1858 In an attempt to force the acceptance of the Lecompton Constitution, a joint committee of Congress drafts the English Bill. Kansas
  Alexander Stephens
  William Seward
  Lecompton Constitution
  English Bill
August 2, 1858 In a straight up or down vote required by the U. S. Congress for admission, the Lecomption Constitution as modified by the English Bill is overwhelmingly defeated. It is so bad that both pro-slave and freestate factions vote against it. The state must approve a different constitution. Kansas
  English Bill
  Lecompton Constitution
  Kansas becomes a state
July 5, 1859
July 29, 1859
The 4th Constitutional Convention, Wyandotte, Kansas Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
July 5, 1859 The fourth Kansas Constitutional Convention is convened in Wyandotte, Kansas. Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
July 29, 1859 The Wyandotte Constitution is adopted by the convention Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
October 4, 1859 The Wyandotte Constitution is ratified by the state of Kansas. It abolishes slavery. Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
January 29, 1861 Kansas admitted to the Union Kansas
  Bleeding Kansas
  Kansas becomes a state
July 4, 1861 The Kansas Flag is introduced Kansas
  Flags of the Civil War
August 19, 1863 300 men under the command of William Quantrill, popularly known as Quantrill's Raiders, leave Blackwater Creek, Missouri heading for Lawrence, Kansas Kansas
Missouri
August 21, 1863 Quantrill's Raiders, now numbering more 400, attack Lawrence, Kansas, killing every male they could find who was old enough to carry a gun (a total of 183 men). One they missed was U. S. Senator James H. Lane, who hid in a cornfield in his nightshirt. Quantrill's men burned the town following the raid Kansas
Missouri
January 11, 1867 Kansas ratifies the 14th Amendment Kansas
  14th Amendment


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