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Mill Springs National Cemetery
Mill Springs National Cemetery

National Cemetery Entrance, Nancy, Kentucky
Sign at the entrance to Mill Springs National Cemetery, Nancy, Kentucky
One of the first twelve designated National Cemeteries, the Mill Springs National Cemetery began with the Union soldiers who died during and after the Battle of Mill Springs on January 19, 1862. It was originally designated as Logan's Crossroads Cemetery later in 1862, but because of the war it did not open until July 7, 1867. William and Nancy Logan donated the land for the cemetery to the federal government and their graves are included under a unique marble shaft.

The area was known as Logan's Crossroads because the Logan's were large landowners in the area, owning the site of both the Union encampment and the site of the battle. Nancy Logan became the first postmistress and the current name of the location, Nancy, Kentucky, is in her honor. Both Nancy and William Logan are buried within the cemetery, their graves marked by private monuments.

Bodies of Union solders who died during the battle were brought back to the Union camp buried. Many graves were marked (with wooden markers). Some, however, were buried in unmarked graves. When work began on the National Cemetery, the first order of business was to disinter the casualties of the battle and reinter them in the cemetery. While many of the men could be identified, those who did not have markers originally and those whose markers had succumbed to the elements were buried in unmarked graves with stone posts bearing numbers instead of the tradition name and rank. Others from nearby, smaller battles, were also brought to the cemetery.

In addition to Civil War casualties the cemetery contains the bodies of other men who served their country. including a prominent Medal of Honor awardee. He is Sergeant Brent Woods, a Buffalo Soldier who earned his medal during the Indian Wars in New Mexico in 1881. He was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1894. Woods was born in Pulaski County, Kentucky.

Location:8 miles west of Somerset, Kentucky
Directions:From Knoxville: Take I-75 North to Kentucky. Take Exit 41 (London/Somerset). At the bottom of the ramp turn left on Highway 80. Travel 30 miles to Somerset on Route 80/Russell S.Dyche Memorial Highway. About a mile after crossing U. S. 27, Highway 80 turns left when the Dyche Memorial Highway becomes the Louis B. Nunn Memorial Highway. Highway 80 then joins BR (Business Route) 80 and turns right. The Mill Springs National Cemetery is on the right.

From Lexington: Take I-75 South to Exit 62 (Renfro Valley). At the bottom of the ramp turn right on U. S. 25w (towards Mt. Vernon) and turn right on Kentucky Highway 461 for 30 miles. Turn left on Route 80/Russell S.Dyche Memorial Highway. About a mile after crossing U. S. 27, Highway 80 turns left when the Dyche Memorial Highway becomes the Louis B. Nunn Memorial Highway (Cumberland Pkwy.). Highway 80 then joins BR (Business Route) 80 and turns right. The Mill Springs National Cemetery is on the right in about 6 miles

Addtional Information:Mill Springs National Cemetery
Nancy, KY 42544
Phone: (859) 885-5727
FAX: (859) 887-4860

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