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William Tecumseh Sherman
Civil War Encyclopedia >> People - Union Military
January 2, 1860 The Louisiana State Seminary of Higher Learning is established at Pineville. William Tecumseh Sherman is Superintendent. It later becomes LSU. Louisiana
March 2, 1860 Classes begin at the Seminary of Higher Learning at Pineville
July 21, 1861 (First) Manassas (Confederate)
(First) Bull Run (Union)

About 25 miles southwest of Washington the first major battle of the Civil War pits Irvin McDowell [US] against P. G. T. Beauregard [CS] and Joe Johnston [CS].
Virginia
  First Manassas - First Bull Run
  P. G. T. Beauregard
  Irvin McDowell
  Joseph E. Johnston
  Army of Northern Virginia
  James Longstreet
  John B. Gordon
  Stonewall Jackson
  Richard Ewell
  Samuel Garland
  Ambrose Burnside
  Samuel Heintzelman
July 31, 1861 11 Union officers are submitted to Congress to be promoted to brigadier general
  William B. Franklin
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Samuel Heintzelman
  Joseph Hooker
  Ulysses S. Grant
October 8, 1861 General William Tecumseh Sherman replaces General Robert Anderson as commander of the Department of the Cumberland. Anderson had suffered a severe mental breakdown.
November 15, 1861 William Tecumseh Sherman is replaced by Don Carlos Buell at the head of the reorganized Department of Ohio. Sherman had assumed command as senior officer when Anderson was relieved of duty.
  Don Carlos Buell
  Army of the Ohio
March 15, 1862 William Tecumseh Sherman and Stephen Hurlbut arrive at Pittsburg Landing and move inland to Shiloh Baptist Church.
  Battle of Shiloh
April 6, 1862
April 7, 1862
Battle of Pittsburg Landing [Union]
Battle of Shiloh [Confederate]

Ulysses S. Grant [US] defeats Albert Sidney Johnston [CS] in southwest Tennessee. P. G. T. Beauregard assumed command following Johnston's death

Confederate Losses
1,723 dead
8,012 wounded
959 missing
Union Losses
1,754 dead
8,408 wounded
2,885 missing
Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Sherman's Memoirs on Shiloh
  P. G. T. Beauregard
  Battle of Shiloh
  Braxton Bragg
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  Don Carlos Buell
  Albert Sidney Johnston
  John Breckinridge
  William Hardee
  William 'Bull' Nelson
  Lew Wallace
  Lew Wallace at Shiloh
  Army of the Tennessee
  James McPherson
  Army of Mississippi
December 18, 1862 In preparation for his assault on the Confederate fortress at Vicksburg, Ulysess S. Grant reorganizes his forces into 4 Corps (13th, 15th, 16th, 17th) under John A. McLernand, William T. Sherman, Stephen A. Hurlbut and James B. McPherson respectively
  First Vicksburg Campaign
  Ulysses S. Grant
December 20, 1862 U. S. 15th Corps under William Tecumseh Sherman boards transports at Memphis to sail down the Mississippi to Chickasaw Bayou. Ulysses S. Grant called off a supporting campaign over land because of continued Rebel raids Tennessee
  First Vicksburg Campaign
December 26, 1862 Sherman's expedition lands near Steele's Bayou on the Yazoo River Mississippi
  First Vicksburg Campaign
December 29, 1862 Battle of Chickasaw Bayou

William Tecumseh Sherman [US] tries to assault a strong Confederate position atop a series of bluffs north of Vicksburg held by John Pemberton [CS]
Mississippi
  First Vicksburg Campaign
January 2, 1863 General Sherman abandons his attempt to take Vicksburg Mississippi
  First Vicksburg Campaign
January 4, 1863 Major General McClernand begins to move up the Arkansas River towards Arkansas Post. He orders General Sherman to accompany him, but he has not received authorization for such a movement.
  John A. McClernand
January 10, 1863
January 11, 1863
Battle of Arkansas Post
Battle of Fort Hindman

General John McClernand [US] defeats Brigadier General T. J. Churchill [CS] at Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. Defending the outpost on the Arkansas River, 5,000 Confederates are surrounded by a force of 50,000 Union troops, and a U. S. Naval squadron under the command of Admiral David Porter. The Navy silenced the Confederate artillery and McClernand attacked, gaining the outer walls. The Confederates then surrendered.
Arkansas
  John A. McClernand
  First Vicksburg Campaign
March 16, 1863 Ulysses S. Grant ends his Yazoo Pass expedition, but orders William Tecumseh Sherman to try Steele's Bayou again.
  Second Vicksburg Campaign
March 24, 1863 A small skirmish at Black Bayou marked the end of General William Tecumseh Sherman's attempt to find an unguarded water route into Vicksburg. Mississippi
  Second Vicksburg Campaign
May 13, 1863 Two corps, under William Tecumseh Sherman and James McPherson, advance on Jackson Mississippi
  Second Vicksburg Campaign
May 14, 1863 Battle of Jackson

After a brief fight, McPherson and Sherman's corps take Jackson, driving Joe Johnston off.
Mississippi
  Joseph E. Johnston
May 19, 1863 William Tecumseh Sherman [US] launches a full scale frontal assault against Rebel lines in Vicksburg. He is repulsed with heavy losses, especially near the Stockade Redan Mississippi
  Battle of Vicksburg
  Army of the Tennessee
May 26, 1863
July 4, 1863
Siege of Vicksburg

Date of the start of siege varies from May 18 - May 26.
Mississippi
  Ulysses S. Grant
  John A. McClernand
  James McPherson
July 9, 1863
July 16, 1863
Battle of Jackson Mississippi
  Joseph E. Johnston
November 15, 1863 Moving east from the Mississippi, General William Tecumseh Sherman arrives in Stevenson, Alabama with four divisions. Sherman then confers with Grant in Chattanooga. Alabama
Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
November 25, 1863 Battle of Missionary Ridge, Chattanooga

Three Union armies attacked the Army of Tennessee atop Missionary Ridge, east of downtown Chattanooga. Patrick Cleburne stopped William Tecumseh Sherman from the north, although outnumbered 10 to 1. Joe Hooker was seriously delayed by burnt bridges and failed to hit the southern end of Bragg's line near Rossville, Georgia. Thomas' Army of the Cumberland struck the center, breaking Bragg's line and forcing a retreat. Sheridan, ordered to pursue, was stopped dead in his tracks by William Hardee's rear guard action.
Tennessee
Georgia
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Battles for Chattanooga
  Braxton Bragg
  John Breckinridge
  George Thomas
  Philip Sheridan
  Army of the Cumberland
  Patrick Cleburne
  Joseph Hooker
  William Hardee
  Army of Tennessee
November 28, 1863 Ulysses S. Grant orders William Tecumseh Sherman to advance on Knoxville and relieve Ambrose Burnside Tennessee
  Ambrose Burnside
  Siege of Knoxville
  Ulysses S. Grant
December 6, 1863 William Tecumseh Sherman enters Knoxville, formally ending the siege Tennessee
  Siege of Knoxville
February 3, 1864 William Tecumseh Sherman, having moved to Vicksburg by boat, begins the Meridian Campaign Mississippi
  Meridian Campaign
  Leonidas Polk
February 5, 1864 Sherman enters Jackson, Mississippi Mississippi
  Meridian Campaign
February 14, 1864 Federals take Meridian. They continue their "work," tearing up railroad infrastructure and destroying locomotives, but there is little Leonidas Polk can do Mississippi
  Leonidas Polk
  Meridian Campaign
March 17, 1864 William Tecumseh Sherman, meeting with Grant in Nashville, is promoted to Military Division of the Mississippi commanding the Department of the Ohio, Department of the Tennessee, Department of the Cumberland and the Department of the Arkansas. Major General James McPherson is promoted to Sherman's old position, commander of the Army of the Tennessee Tennessee
  Ulysses S. Grant
  James McPherson
  Army of the Tennessee
April 9, 1864 Ulysses S. Grant issues campaign orders. He tells George Meade [US], "Wherever Lee goes, you will go there." Similar orders are issued to William Tecumseh Sherman
  George Meade
  Ulysses S. Grant
April 27, 1864 Northern armies break winter camp in preparation for the Spring campaigns
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Overland Campaign
  George Meade
  Atlanta Campaign
May 13, 1864
May 15, 1864
Battle of Resaca Georgia
  George Thomas
  Joseph E. Johnston
  Atlanta Campaign
  Battle of Resaca
  Leonidas Polk
  William Hardee
  James McPherson
May 27, 1864 Battle of Picketts Mill Georgia
  George Thomas
  Joseph E. Johnston
  Atlanta Campaign
  Oliver O. Howard
June 14, 1864 While inspecting his lines, Leonidas Polk is killed at Pine Mountain by an artillery blast ordered by William Tecumseh Sherman. Georgia
  Leonidas Polk
  Atlanta Campaign
  Generals Who Died In the Civil War
June 15, 1864 General Sherman, learning of the defeat at Brice's Crossroads, writes Edwin Stanton "But Forrest is the very devil, ...There never will be peace in Tennessee till Forrest is dead."
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
  Brice's Crossroads
June 27, 1864 Battle of Kennesaw Mountain Georgia
  Joseph E. Johnston
  Atlanta Campaign
  George Thomas
  Kennesaw Mountain
July 26, 1864 W. T. Sherman appoints O. O. Howard commander of the Army of the Tennessee
  Atlanta Campaign
  Army of the Tennessee
August 27, 1864 Forward elements of Sherman's army move south to cut Hood's last supply line to Atlanta, the Macon and Western Railroad Georgia
August 30, 1864 Sherman's army descends in force south of Atlanta. Hood responds by sending corps under Patrick Cleburne and Stephen Lee to defend the Macon and Western Railroad Georgia
  John Bell Hood
  Patrick Cleburne
August 31, 1864
September 1, 1864
Battle of Jonesboro (Jonesborough), Georgia

In the final battle of the Atlanta Campaign, General William Hardee [CS] attacks O. O. Howard's [US] Army of the Tennessee west of the city of Jonesboro. North of the battle John Schofield cut the Macon and Western at Rough and Ready and Hood's Army was in jeopardy. The battle was joined the second day by large numbers of Union troops. Hardee withdraws at nightfall to join Hood at Lovejoy Station
Georgia
  John Bell Hood
  Atlanta Campaign
September 7, 1864 W. T. Sherman [US] orders the evacuation of Atlanta Georgia
October 28, 1864 William Tecumseh Sherman, in Gaylesville, AL, decides to return to his field headquarters in Kingston, GA. rather than pursue John Bell Hood into Alabama. Alabama
Georgia
  John Bell Hood
November 10, 1864 On the 10th of November the movement may be said to have fairly begun, General Sherman in his memoirs regarding the "March to the Sea"
  March to the Sea
November 12, 1864 General Sherman in Cartersville sends his last message to General Thomas in Nashville, Tennessee. He will be out of communication with the North until December 13. Georgia
  March to the Sea
November 14, 1864 Sherman enters Atlanta and divides his 60,000 men into a Left Wing and Right Wing. Georgia
  March to the Sea
November 16, 1864 Some historians use this date as the start of the March to the Sea. By this time Sherman had marched almost 100 miles, destroyed all or part of Rome, Cartersville and Marietta, Georgia and torn up all the Western and Atlanta track between Dalton and Atlanta. Georgia
  March to the Sea
December 13, 1864 Union army captures Ft. McAllister Georgia
  March to the Sea
  Fort McAllister
  Fort McAllister
December 21, 1864 Sherman occupies Savannah Georgia
  March to the Sea
January 19, 1865 After regrouping in Savannah for a month, William Tecumseh Sherman begins moving north into South Carolina South Carolina
February 17, 1865 Sherman captures Columbia. The city is burned, but responsibility for the blaze is still a "hotly" disputed topic. South Carolina
February 22, 1865 Following a bombardment by gunboats under the command of Rear Admiral David Porter, William T. Sherman captures Wilmington North Carolina
  David Porter
March 10, 1865 Now near Fayetteville, North Carolina, the major impediment to Sherman's Army march north was rain. North Carolina
March 11, 1865 Sherman captures Fayetteville North Carolina
March 19, 1865
March 21, 1865
Battle of Bentonville

William Hardee, D. H. Hill and A. P. Stewart combine to attack Slocum's wing on the federal advance. In spite of initial gains they are repulsed. Sherman reinforces Slocum on the second day and Slocum nearly enveloped the Confederate forces on the third day.
North Carolina
  Lafayette McLaws
  Joseph E. Johnston
  William Hardee
  Daniel Harvey Hill
March 27, 1865 Lincoln held a council of war with Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, and David Porter on the River Queen at City Point
  Abraham Lincoln
  Ulysses S. Grant
  David Porter
April 18, 1865 Sherman and Johnston reach agreement on the surrender of all remaining armies in the Confederacy.
  Joseph E. Johnston
April 24, 1865 General William T. Sherman [US] learns of President Johnson's rejection of his surrender terms to Joe Johnston. General Grant, who personally delivered the message, orders Sherman to commence operations against Johnson within 48 hours. Sherman is incensed but obeys orders. North Carolina
  Joseph E. Johnston
  Andrew Johnson
April 26, 1865 Joe Johnston surrenders to William Tecumseh Sherman
  Joseph E. Johnston
May 24, 1865 Grand Review of Sherman's Army
July 25, 1866 Congress establishes "general of the armies" and Ulysses S. Grant is immediately promoted to 4-star general and put in this position. William Tecumseh Sherman assumes the rank of Lt. General.
  Ulysses S. Grant
  General-in-Chief, U. S. Army


William Tecumseh Sherman

Sherman on slavery in Louisiana, 1860

The people of Louisiana were hardly responsible for slavery, as they had inherited it; I found two distinct conditions of slavery, domestic and field hands. The domestic slaves, employed by the families, were probably better treated than any slaves on earth; but the condition of the field-hands was different, depending more on the temper and disposition of their masters and overseers than were those employed about the house. Were I a citizen of Louisiana, and a member of the Legislature, I would deem it wise to bring the legal condition of the slaves more near the status of human beings under all Christian and civilized governments. In the first place, in sales of slaves made by the State, I would forbid the separation of families, letting the father, mother, and children, be sold together to one person, instead of each to the highest bidder. And, again, I would advise the repeal of the statute which enacted a severe penalty for even the owner to teach his slave to read and write, because that actually qualified property and took away a part of its value.

William Tecumseh Sherman



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Civil War Encyclopedia >> People - Union Military

William Tecumseh Sherman was last changed on - October 7, 2011
William Tecumseh Sherman was added in 2005




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