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Stonewall Jackson
Civil War Encyclopedia >> People - Confederate Military
July 1, 1842 West Point Class of 1846 includes George B. McClellan, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson,
  George McClellan
July 1, 1846 Graduating from West Point (rank): George B. McClellan (2), John Gray Foster (4), Jesse Lee Reno (8), Darius Nash Couch (13) Thomas Jonathan Jackson later Stonewall Jackson(17), Truman Seymour (19), Charles Champion Gilbert (21), John Adams (25), Samuel Davis Sturgis (32), George Stoneman (33), William Duncan Smith (35) Dabney Herndon Maury (37), Innis Newton Palmer (38), David Rumph Jones (41), Alfred Gibbs (42), George Henry Gordon (43), Cadmus Marcellus Wilcox (54), William Montgomery Gardner (55), Samuel Bell Maxey (58), George Edward Pickett (59)
  George McClellan
  Darius Couch
  George Stoneman
May 1, 1861 Robert E. Lee orders Stonewall Jackson to remove the weapons and equipment from the arsenal at Harpers Ferry West Virginia
Virginia
  Harpers Ferry
  Robert E. Lee
May 23, 1861 Thomas Jackson strikes the B&O Railroad, capturing 56 locomotives
  Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
June 23, 1861 Thomas Jackson destroys 42 engines and nearly 400 cars of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Martinsburg, Virginia Virginia
West Virginia
  Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
July 21, 1861 (First) Manassas (Confederate)
(First) Bull Run (Union)

About 25 miles southwest of Washington the first major battle of the Civil War pits Irvin McDowell [US] against P. G. T. Beauregard [CS] and Joe Johnston [CS].
Virginia
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  First Manassas - First Bull Run
  P. G. T. Beauregard
  Irvin McDowell
  Joseph E. Johnston
  Army of Northern Virginia
  James Longstreet
  John B. Gordon
  Richard Ewell
  Samuel Garland
  Ambrose Burnside
  Samuel Heintzelman
November 4, 1861 Major General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson assumes command of the Shenandoah Valley District Virginia
December 7, 1861 Stonewall Jackson destroys the West Virginia side of Dam Number 5 on the Potomac River, disrupting the C&O Canal and impacting the Union's ability to repair the B&O Railroad. Maryland
West Virginia
  Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
  Attack on Dam Number 5
January 1, 1862 Stonewall Jackson begins the Romney Campaign from Winchester, Virginia
  Romney Campaign
January 4, 1862 Jackson takes Bath (now West Virginia) West Virginia
  Romney Campaign
January 6, 1862 Stonewall Jackson shells Hancock, MD for 2 days from the West Virginia side of the Potomac West Virginia
  Romney Campaign
January 10, 1862 Federal forces under "Old Ben" Kelley withdraw from Romney West Virginia
  Romney Campaign
January 14, 1862 Confederates under Stonewall Jackson take Romney West Virginia
  Romney Campaign
February 7, 1862 Jackson withdraws from Romney and returns to Winchester West Virginia
  Romney Campaign
March 20, 1862 Threatened by Stonewall Jackson, Nathaniel Banks withdraws from Strasburg to Winchester Virginia
  Nathaniel Banks
March 23, 1862 Battle of Kernstown

In the first battle of the Shenandoah Campaign, Major General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson [CS] loses to Brig. General James Shields [US]
Virginia
May 8, 1862 Battle of McDowell

Stonewall Jackson defeats Robert Milroy in the Shenandoah Valley
Virginia
May 23, 1862 Battle of Front Royal Virginia
May 25, 1862 Battle of Winchester,

Stonewall Jackson [CS] defeats Nathaniel Banks [US]
Virginia
  Nathaniel Banks
June 8, 1862 Battle of Cross Keys
Battle of Union Church

While Robert Ewell [CS] defeated John Fremont [US], Stonewall Jackson guarded Ewell's rear against an attack by James Shields [US].
Virginia
  John C. Fremont
June 9, 1862 Battle of Port Republic

Leaving a brigade to protect against action by Fremont, Robert Ewell [CS] crosses the Shenandoah in support of Stonewall Jackson [CS] in his action againt James Shields [US], resulting in a Confederate victory
Virginia
June 23, 1862 Robert E. Lee plans a counterattack against Union forces preparing to lay siege to Richmond at the Dabbs House Virginia
  Robert E. Lee
  Seven Days Retreat
  Daniel Harvey Hill
  James Longstreet
August 27, 1862 Stonewall Jackson [CS] destroys Army of Virginia supply base at Manassas Junction Virginia
  Northern Virginia Campaign
  Second Manassas - Second Bull Run
  Army of Virginia
August 27, 1862 With Stonewall Jackson on his flank, John Pope is forced to withdraw from the Rappahanock. Pope does not realize that roughly half the Confederate army is between his position and Washington, D. C. Virginia
  Northern Virginia Campaign
  John Pope
  Second Manassas - Second Bull Run
August 28, 1862 Battle of Groveton
Battle of Brawner's Farm

Stonewall Jackson [CS] engages Rufus King [US] near Manassas after eluding John Pope [US].
Virginia
  Northern Virginia Campaign
  John Pope
  Second Manassas - Second Bull Run
  Richard Ewell
  Army of Virginia
August 29, 1862
August 30, 1862
Second Manassas[CS]
Second Bull Run[US]

General John Pope [US] lost to General Robert E. Lee[CS]. General James Longstreet's [CS] 28,000 man assault on August 30 was the largest simultaneous assault of the war in this Confederate victory.

Union losses 13,830

Confederate losses 8,350

Also includes: Manassas Plains, Gainesville
Virginia
  James Longstreet
  Robert E. Lee
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Second Manassas - Second Bull Run
  Fitz-John Porter
  Northern Virginia Campaign
  John Pope
  Gouverneur K. Warren
  John Reynolds
  Army of Virginia
  Joseph Hooker
  Samuel Heintzelman
September 12, 1862
September 15, 1862
Battle of Harpers Ferry

Stonewall Jackson takes 12,000 prisoners
Maryland
Virginia
  Battle of Harpers Ferry
  Harpers Ferry
  Lafayette McLaws
  Antietam
September 17, 1862 Battle of Sharpsburg (Confederate)
Battle of Antietam (Union)
Army of the Potomac under McClellan [US] defeats the Army of Northern Virginia under Lee [CS], resulting in the bloodiest day in American history.

Union losses:12,401 men
2,108 dead
9,540 wounded
753 missing
Confederate losses:10, 406
1,546 dead
7,752 wounded
1,108 missing
Maryland
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  Robert E. Lee
  George McClellan
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Army of the Potomac
  George Meade
  Lafayette McLaws
  Antietam
  Edwin Vose Sumner
November 6, 1862 Confederates James Longstreet and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson are promoted to Lieutenant General
  James Longstreet
May 1, 1863
May 4, 1863
Battle of Chancellorsville

General "Fighting Joe" Hooker's Army of the Potomac is defeated by Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia as it crosses the Rappahannock on the way to Richmond

Union: 17,268

Confederate: 12,821
Virginia
  Robert E. Lee
  Joseph Hooker
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Army of the Potomac
  Lafayette McLaws
  Chancellorsville
  John Reynolds
  Darius Couch
  George Stoneman
May 2, 1863 General Stonewall Jackson is shot 3 times in a friendly fire incident Virginia
  Generals Who Died In the Civil War
  Chancellorsville
May 10, 1863 Stonewall Jackson dies at a field hospital near Guiney Station, VA, Virginia
  Generals Who Died In the Civil War


Stonewall Jackson

Other names: Southern Cromwell

Stonewall Jackson fought from Bull Run until his untimely death shortly after Chancellorsville
Major General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson
Two generals in the Confederate Army evoked a certain kind of fear in the northern armies, Stonewall Jackson and P. G. T. Beauregard. However modern authors choose to interpret the stoic Jackson, he was one of the Best Generals of the Civil War

At the outbreak of war, Major Jackson was ordered to Harper's Ferry by Robert E. Lee, then commander of the Virginia militia. Jackson realized holding the city without Maryland Heights (the hill across the Potomac in Maryland) would be difficult. Without orders he occupied and fortified the hill with men from Maryland and an independent force from Kentucky, greatly lessoning the political fallout of the move. Jackson also omitted all orders to the forces for the seizure of the heights.

Jackson was already looking ahead to a federal invasion and established a line of advance to join any force opposing the federals. Like Lee in Richmond, Jackson felt the obvious point to defend would be Manassas Junction.

Quotes:
Draw the sword and throw away the scabbard

Links appearing on this page:

Best Generals of the Civil War
Harper's Ferry
P. G. T. Beauregard.
Robert E. Lee

Civil War Encyclopedia >> People - Confederate Military

Stonewall Jackson was last changed on - November 21, 2006
Stonewall Jackson was added in 2005





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