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Samuel Heintzelman
July 21, 1861 (First) Manassas (Confederate)
(First) Bull Run (Union)

About 25 miles southwest of Washington the first major battle of the Civil War pits Irvin McDowell [US] against P. G. T. Beauregard [CS] and Joe Johnston [CS].
Virginia
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  First Manassas - First Bull Run
  P. G. T. Beauregard
  Irvin McDowell
  Joseph E. Johnston
  Army of Northern Virginia
  James Longstreet
  John B. Gordon
  Stonewall Jackson
  Richard Ewell
  Samuel Garland
  Ambrose Burnside
July 31, 1861 11 Union officers are submitted to Congress to be promoted to brigadier general
  William B. Franklin
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Joseph Hooker
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  Ulysses S. Grant
March 8, 1862 Abraham Lincoln, chagrined at George McClellan for not appointing corps commanders, names Edwin Vose Sumnner, Samuel Heintzelman, Erasmus Keyes and Irvin McDowell for him.
  Irvin McDowell
  Abraham Lincoln
  George McClellan
  Edwin Vose Sumner
May 5, 1862 Battle of Williamsburg

Major General James Longstreet [CS] nearly defeats Major General "Fighting Joe" Hooker [US] during a rear-guard action.
Virginia
  Peninsula Campaign
  James Longstreet
  Lafayette McLaws
  George McClellan
  Battle of Williamsburg
  William Farrar Smith
  Winfield Scott Hancock
  Jubal Anderson Early
  Joseph Hooker
  Samuel Garland
June 30, 1862 Battle of Frayser's Farm
Battle of White Oak Swamp [Alt.]
Battle of Glendale
Many other names

Robert E. Lee's [CS] last chance to cut the Army of the Potomac in two. George McClellan [US] withdraws to Malvern Hill.
Virginia
  Seven Days Retreat
  Battle of Glendale
  George Meade
  Joseph Hooker
  James Longstreet
  A. P. Hill
August 29, 1862
August 30, 1862
Second Manassas[CS]
Second Bull Run[US]

General John Pope [US] lost to General Robert E. Lee[CS]. General James Longstreet's [CS] 28,000 man assault on August 30 was the largest simultaneous assault of the war in this Confederate victory.

Union losses 13,830

Confederate losses 8,350

Also includes: Manassas Plains, Gainesville
Virginia
  James Longstreet
  Robert E. Lee
  Stonewall Jackson
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Second Manassas - Second Bull Run
  Fitz-John Porter
  Northern Virginia Campaign
  John Pope
  Gouverneur K. Warren
  John Reynolds
  Army of Virginia
  Joseph Hooker
September 9, 1862 Samuel P. Heintzelman is put in command of defenses south of Washington, D. C.
  Washington D. C.
October 26, 1862 Major General Samuel Heintzelman [US] is put in command of Union forces protecting Washington D. C., replacing Nathaniel Banks
  Nathaniel Banks
  Washington D. C.


Samuel Heintzelman

In 1851, Heintzelman was in command of Fort Yuma when he was forced to withdraw because of a supply problem. Leaving Thomas William Sweeny in charge of a small contingent of men, Heintzelman moved west to San Diego. Sweeny and his 10 men would be relieved late in the year.

When Juan Cortinas and 50 men seized Brownsville, Texas on September 28, 1859, there were no American troops in the area. Samuel Heintzelman, a West Point graduate, arrived in Brownsville on December 5 to quell any insurrection. Using a force of 150 men, mostly Texas Rangers, Heintzelman put down the Cortinas Revolt near Rio Grande City.

A corps commander in the field as part of the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsula Campaign and as part of the Army of Virginia during Second Manassas, Samuel Peter Heintzelman commanded the 22nd Corps responsible for the protection of Washington from 1863-1865.

Links appearing on this page:

Army of the Potomac
Peninsula Campaign

Samuel Heintzelman was last changed on - October 26, 2007
Samuel Heintzelman was added on - May 11, 2006



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