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John Bell Hood
Civil War Encyclopedia >> People - Confederate Military
May 7, 1862 Battle of West Point
Battle of Eltham's Landing

General William B. Franklin [US] skirmishes with General John Bell Hood [CS]
Virginia
  William B. Franklin
  Peninsula Campaign
June 27, 1862 Battle of Gaines Mill [US]
Battle of First Cold Harbor [CS]
Battle of the Chickahominy [Alternate]

John Bell Hood [CS] and George Pickett [CS] breakthrough Fitz John Porter's [US] line, forcing Union troops south of the Chickahominy River and severing McClellan's supply line to Eltham's Landing (White House, West Point)
Virginia
  Seven Days Retreat
  Battle of Gaines Mill
  Daniel Harvey Hill
  A. P. Hill
  Fitz-John Porter
  Gouverneur K. Warren
  George Pickett
  George Meade
  John Reynolds
July 1, 1863
July 3, 1863
Battle of Gettysburg

General Robert E. Lee [CS] advances into Pennsylvania where he meets George Meade [US]. First battling north of the city, by the second day Union forces had retreated south, forming a strong line as men arrived almost continuously. On the third day, the infamous Pickett's Charge marked the end of the Confederates hope for a victory

The bloodiest three days in American history
Pennsylvania
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  Robert E. Lee
  James Longstreet
  George Meade
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Army of the Potomac
  J. E. B. Stuart
  Lafayette McLaws
  Winfield Scott Hancock
  George Armstrong Custer
  Battle of Gettysburg
  Richard Ewell
  George Pickett
  John Reynolds
  The Gettysburg Campaign
  Early action at Herbst Woods
  James Archer
  George Armstrong Custer
  Jubal Anderson Early
September 19, 1863
September 20, 1863
Battle of Chickamauga

General Braxton Bragg [CS] tries to split General William Rosecrans [US] forces as they try to return to the safety of Chattanooga. A second day breakthrough at the Brotherton Cabin forces the federals into a retreat, halted only by the Rock of Chickamauga, General George Thomas on Snodgrass Hill

The bloodiest two days in American history cost the Federals 1,657 dead, 9,756 wounded, and 4,757 missing for a total of 16,170 casualties out of 58,000 troops. The Confederate losses were 2,312 dead, 14,674 wounded and 1,468 for a total of 18,545 out of 66,000 troops.
Georgia
  Gordon Granger
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  William S. Rosecrans
  Braxton Bragg
  George Thomas
  Army of the Cumberland
  Philip Sheridan
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
  Lafayette McLaws
  Battle of Chickamauga
  James Garfield
  Leonidas Polk
  Daniel Harvey Hill
  James Longstreet
  Chickamauga Campaign
May 25, 1864 Battle of New Hope Church

"Fighting Joe" Hooker runs into John Bell Hood's entrenched line in Paulding County
Georgia
  Joseph Hooker
  Atlanta Campaign
  Joseph E. Johnston
June 22, 1864 Battle of Kolb's Farm

To prevent Joe Hooker [US] and John Schofield [US] from outflanking the Confederate Army, General John Bell Hood [CS] attacks, without orders.
Georgia
  Joseph Hooker
  Atlanta Campaign
July 17, 1864 General Joseph E. Johnston relieved of command of the Army of Tennessee. John Bell Hood replaces him. Georgia
  Joseph E. Johnston
  Atlanta Campaign
July 20, 1864 Battle of Peachtree Creek

John Bell Hood [CS] attacks George Thomas after he crosses Peachtree Creek.
Georgia
  George Thomas
  Atlanta Campaign
August 30, 1864 Sherman's army descends in force south of Atlanta. Hood responds by sending corps under Patrick Cleburne and Stephen Lee to defend the Macon and Western Railroad Georgia
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  Patrick Cleburne
August 31, 1864
September 1, 1864
Battle of Jonesboro (Jonesborough), Georgia

In the final battle of the Atlanta Campaign, General William Hardee [CS] attacks O. O. Howard's [US] Army of the Tennessee west of the city of Jonesboro. North of the battle John Schofield cut the Macon and Western at Rough and Ready and Hood's Army was in jeopardy. The battle was joined the second day by large numbers of Union troops. Hardee withdraws at nightfall to join Hood at Lovejoy Station
Georgia
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  Atlanta Campaign
September 25, 1864 Jefferson Davis visits General John Bell Hood at Palmetto. Hood asks permission to relieve William Hardee.
  Jefferson Davis
  William Hardee
October 4, 1864 Moving north along the Western and Atlantic Railroad in an attempt to sever Sherman's supply line, John Bell Hood attacks blockhouses and encampments at Acworth and Moon's Station.
  Western and Atlantic Railroad
October 5, 1864 Battle of Allatoona Pass

Confederates under Samuel French attack entrenched Federals under John Corse protecting the Western and Atlantic Railroad. Union: 2000 engaged, 142 (k), 352 (w), 212 (m), 706 (c). Confederate: 2000 engaged, 122 (k), 443 (w), 234 (m), 799 (c)
Georgia
  Battle of Allatoona Pass
  Western and Atlantic Railroad
October 26, 1864 Battle of Decatur, Alabama Alabama
  Nashville Campaign
October 28, 1864 William Tecumseh Sherman, in Gaylesville, AL, decides to return to his field headquarters in Kingston, GA. rather than pursue John Bell Hood into Alabama. Alabama
Georgia
  William Tecumseh Sherman
November 30, 1864 Battle of Franklin Tennessee
  Nashville Campaign
December 15, 1864
December 16, 1864
Battle of Nashville Tennessee
  George Thomas
  Nashville Campaign


John Bell Hood

John Bell Hood's first military assignment of the Civil War came to him from an old commander - Hood probably thought of him as a friend - Robert E. Lee. General Lee assigned him to join John Magruder's enthusiastically named Army of the Peninsula, protecting Richmond from any incursions from Fort Monroe. Magruder made Lieutenant Hood a captain, major and lieutenant colonel in quick succession. Although he and his men from Texas were reassigned north, they returned to Virginia's lower peninsula a few months later.

As Union troops gained ground in the Peninsula Campaign, George McClellan leapfrogged a corps to West Point. To protect both the Confederate army and supply wagons withdrawing from Williamsburg Hood was ordered to brush back the Yankees at West Point. He ran into federal pickets at Eltham's Landing and attacked a reinforced skirmish line protecting the harbor. As the battle heated up Hood's commander, William Whiting, ordered artillery to advance in support of the brigade but the battery was out of range. Hood, however, was not out of range of federal gunboats on the York River and these forced him to withdraw. The wagon train safely withdrew because of Hood's attack.

Hood's brigade was assembled about 2 miles east of the depot at Fair Oaks. When Daniel Harvey Hill [CS] pushed back the Yankees along the Williamsburg Pike to the crossing at Seven Pines, Whiting advanced Hood and others to support the Confederate left flank and attack a small garrison of Yankees in the Fair Oaks depot. Hood, on the right of the line advanced past the depot towards Seven Pines, almost completely missing the battle that saw Joe Johnston seriously wounded.

Stonewall Jackson requested reinforcements before the Seven Days Battle and Lee reassigned Hood to the Army of the Shenandoah. Hood's first action during the Union retreat was at the Battle of Gaines Mill. Near the end of the battle Lee rode up to Whitings Division and asked for Hood. Lee had a special assignment for the brigadier general who had served with him in Texas. Moving quickly across an open meadow and crossing Boatswains Swamp (a creek), Hood's men charged the forward skirmish line with bayonets, drove them back, then blasted a hole in Fitz-John Porter's main line with their muskets, relieving pressure on A. P. Hill's men and initiating a general advance of Confederate troops across the stream. Porter, protecting McClellan's only supply line to his base at White House, was force to withdraw, putting the entire Army of the Potomac at risk.

Hood returned to the Shenandoah Valley with Jackson when Lee drove the Yankees from the Peninsula, but not for long. He was recalled and assigned to Longstreet in August, 1862 and his troop strength increased. At Second Manassas Hood held the center of the Confederate line. When Jackson, on Hood's left, came under attack, Lee ordered Hood to probe the federal lines for weakness. Never one to "probe," Hood advanced a reinforced skirmish line and ordered Evander Law to attack an open artillery battery. Only darkness stopped Hood's advance.

The next morning Hood was ordered to remain in position. As federals attacked Jackson along the unfinished railroad grade he could only watch. Then came orders to advance, rolling to his left to hit the flank of the 4 federal corps (Reno, Hooker, Kearny, McDowell) attacking Jackson. The Yankees were forced to withdraw in disarray, just as they had been forced a year earlier at First Manassas.

Following the battle of South Mountain, Hood drew rear-guard duty which put him at the north end of the Confederate line on Hagerstown Pike for Antietam. Just before sundown on September 16, "Fighting Joe" Hooker ordered General George Meade to advance against Hood's position as the Yankees prepared for battle the following day. Hood's men stopped the advance with several hundred musket balls and Hooker decided to wait until tomorrow.



Links appearing on this page:

"Fighting Joe" Hooker
Antietam
Battle of Gaines Mill
Daniel Harvey Hill
Fair Oaks
First Manassas
Fitz-John Porter
George McClellan
George Meade
Joe Johnston
John Magruder
Peninsula Campaign
Robert E. Lee
Second Manassas
Seven Days Battle
Stonewall Jackson
Texas
Williamsburg

Civil War Encyclopedia >> People - Confederate Military

John Bell Hood was last changed on - December 6, 2006
John Bell Hood was added in 2005



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