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Abraham Lincoln
Civil War Encyclopedia >> People - Union Political
February 12, 1809 Abraham Lincoln born, Hardin County, Kentucky Kentucky
December 18, 1816 [circa] Abraham Lincoln's family completes their move to Indiana (near Vincennes, where the Wabash River forms the border of Indiana and Illinois) Indiana
Kentucky
March 15, 1830 Abraham Lincoln moves to Macon County, Illinois, about 10 miles south of Decatur Indiana
Illinois
March 9, 1832 Abraham Lincoln announces his candidacy for the Illinois House Illinois
July 10, 1832 Lincoln's militia unit is mustered out, ending his involvement in the Blackhawk War Illinois
August 6, 1832 Abraham Lincoln is defeated in a run for the Illinois House Illinois
August 4, 1834 Abraham Lincoln elected to the Illinois House Illinois
September 12, 1849 Abraham Lincoln writes a letter to John M. Clayton, rejecting President Zachary Taylor's offer for Lincoln to become territorial governor of Oregon Oregon
  Zachary Taylor
June 15, 1858 Abraham Lincoln makes his "House Divided" speech before the Illinois Republican Convention to kick off his senatorial run against Stephen Douglas Illinois
  A House Divided [Full Text]
  Stephen A. Douglas
  Republican Party
August 21, 1858 First of seven Lincoln-Douglas debates Illinois
  Stephen A. Douglas
August 27, 1858 Second Lincoln-Douglas debate, Freeport, Illinois Illinois
  Stephen A. Douglas
September 15, 1858 Third Lincoln-Douglas debate Illinois
  Stephen A. Douglas
September 18, 1858 Fourth Lincoln-Douglas debate, Charleston, Illinois Illinois
  Stephen A. Douglas
October 7, 1858 Fifth Lincoln-Douglas debate, Galesburg, Illinois Illinois
  Stephen A. Douglas
October 13, 1858 Sixth Lincoln-Douglas debate, Quincy, Illinois Illinois
  Stephen A. Douglas
October 15, 1858 Seventh Lincoln-Douglas debate, Alton, Illinois Illinois
  Stephen A. Douglas
February 27, 1860 After being photographed by Matthew Brady, Abraham Lincoln speaks at the Cooper Institute in New York City. New York
  The Election of 1860
May 16, 1860
May 18, 1860
Republican Convention is held in Chicago, Illinois. William H. Seward, Salmon P. Chase and Abraham Lincoln of Illinois are the leading contenders from a field of 12 candidates. Lincoln wins on the third ballot. Hannibal Hamlin of Maine, an outspoken, long-time abolitionist is chosen for vice-president. Illinois
  The Election of 1860
  Salmon P. Chase
  1860 Republican Convention
  William Seward
  Republican Party
November 6, 1860 Republican Abraham Lincoln wins the Presidential election with 39.7% of the vote, defeating Stephen Douglas, John Breckinridge and John Bell.
  Stephen A. Douglas
  Causes of the Civil War
  John Breckinridge
  The Election of 1860
  Republican Party
December 22, 1860 Lincoln's opposition to a section of the Crittenden Compromise becomes public, ending the proposal's potential as a possible solution
February 11, 1861 As President-elect Abraham Lincoln begins his journey to Washington D. C. from Springfield, Illinois, President-elect Jefferson Davis journeys from Vicksburg, Mississippi to Montgomery, Alabama to accept the Presidency of the Confederate States. Mississippi
Alabama
Illinois
  Jefferson Davis
  Convention of Seceding States
February 11, 1861 The Electoral College begins to meet amid fears of a show of force against the election of Abraham Lincoln. General Winfield Scott reinforces the city and the meeting occurs as planned. Vice-president John C. Breckinridge declares Lincoln the winner of the Election of 1860
  John Breckinridge
  Winfield Scott
  The Election of 1860
February 13, 1861 The U. S. Electoral College makes Lincoln's win official
  The Election of 1860
February 20, 1861 President-elect Abraham Lincoln and Vice-president Elect Hannibal Hamlin of Maine meet in New York City Maine
New York
February 22, 1861
February 23, 1861
Under the watchful eyes of Allan Pinkerton, Abraham Lincoln travels in secrecy to Washington, D. C. Pinkerton had been worried about the trip through Baltimore, Maryland, a Southern-leaning city Maryland
  Washington D. C.
February 25, 1861 President-Elect Lincoln meets with both houses of Congress
March 4, 1861 Abraham Lincoln is inaugurated President of the United States. 7 states had already seceded.
March 29, 1861 Abraham Lincoln decides to reinforce Fort Sumter.
  Fort Sumter
April 6, 1861 Abraham Lincoln sends a message to Governor Pickens informing him that Fort Sumter will be reprovisioned and that if the effort is resisted the fort will be reinforced South Carolina
  Fort Sumter
April 15, 1861 President Lincoln calls for 75,000 voluteers for three months service to deal with the "insurrection."
April 19, 1861 Surprising most people, Lincoln calls for a blockade of Southern ports, a major element of Winfield Scott's Anaconda Plan
  Winfield Scott
April 27, 1861 Lincoln extends the blockade to include Virginia and North Carolina Virginia
North Carolina
September 11, 1861 President Lincoln orders John C. Fremont to rescind his order freeing some slaves in Missouri and issue a new order conforming to the Confiscation Act passed by Congress Missouri
  John C. Fremont
  The Emancipation of Slaves
  Committee on the Conduct of the War
October 4, 1861 President Lincoln views a tethered hot-air balloon ascent outside Washington D. C. The balloon was considered a top secret observation instrument to be used for observation during battles
December 9, 1861 Clement Vallandigham sends a resolution to Abraham Lincoln, asking for "all proclamations, or orders... relating to the pending contest" Ohio
  Clement Vallandigham
December 21, 1861 Abraham Lincoln signs a bill creating the Navy Medal of Honor, America's first medal. It is to be presented to sailors or marines who "...distinguish themselves by their gallantry and other seamanlike qualities..."
  Civil War Firsts
December 23, 1861 At a Cabinet meeting President Lincoln and Secretary of State William Seward present their response to the British note protesting the Trent Affair
  Trent Affair
January 10, 1862 With McClellan ill, Abraham Lincoln calls a White House meeting with Irvin McDowell, William Franklin, Salmon Chase, Edwin Stanton, and Thomas Scott. Lincoln told them "..if McClellan is not going to use the Army anytime soon, I would like to borrow it."
  George McClellan
  Edwin Stanton
  Salmon P. Chase
February 20, 1862 William Wallace "Willie" Lincoln dies. The 12-year-old son of U. S. President Abraham Lincoln probably had typhoid fever.
March 3, 1862 Abraham Lincoln appoints Andrew Johnson to be military governor of Tennessee Tennessee
  Andrew Johnson
March 6, 1862 Abraham Lincoln proposes that slaves in the border states be emancipated gradually, with compensation to the owners
March 8, 1862 Abraham Lincoln, chagrined at George McClellan for not appointing corps commanders, names Edwin Vose Sumnner, Samuel Heintzelman, Erasmus Keyes and Irvin McDowell for him.
  Irvin McDowell
  George McClellan
  Edwin Vose Sumner
  Samuel Heintzelman
March 11, 1862 President Lincoln relieves George McClellan as General-in-Chief of the U. S. Army. He continues as commander of the Army of the Potomac
  General-in-Chief, U. S. Army
  George McClellan
  Army of the Potomac
April 16, 1862 President Lincoln signs legislation freeing the estimated 3,500 slaves in Washington, D. C.
  Washington D. C.
May 19, 1862 Lincoln rescinds David Hunter's emancipation of the slaves in his department and uses the opportunity to call for a gradual emancipation
  The Emancipation of Slaves
May 20, 1862 Lincoln signs the Homestead Act, giving citizens 21 years or older the right to buy 160 acres of land in the West
June 19, 1862 Lincoln signs the bill forbidding slavery in U. S. Territories
July 1, 1862 President Lincoln signs the Pacific Railway Act, incorporating the Union Pacific Railroad and subsidizing it with federal funds
July 2, 1862 Lincoln issues a call for 300,000 3-year enlistments
July 8, 1862 Abraham Lincoln visits with George McClellan at Harrison's Landing Virginia
  George McClellan
July 11, 1862 President Lincoln names Henry Halleck General-in-Chief
  General-in-Chief, U. S. Army
  Henry Halleck
July 22, 1862 President Lincoln presents his Emancipation Proclaimation to his Cabinet. William Seward recommends waiting until a victory to present it to the public.
  William Seward
  Emancipation Proclamation
  The Emancipation of Slaves
  Salmon P. Chase
September 22, 1862 Following the preemptive strike at Antietam President Lincoln issues the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in states or portions of states still in rebellion on January 1, 1863
  Emancipation Proclamation
  The Emancipation of Slaves
  Antietam
October 1, 1862 Abraham Lincoln visits Harper's Ferry on his way to Antietam Virginia
West Virginia
October 2, 1862 Abraham Lincoln arrives at George McClellan's headquarters in Sharpsburg Maryland
November 5, 1862 Lincoln orders McClellan to be releived of command because he did not pursue Lee following the Confederate loss at Antietam
  George McClellan
December 1, 1862 On the first day of the new Congress President Abraham Lincoln proposes 3 amendments to the U. S. Constitution. First, all slaves would be gradually emancipated until 1900. Second, slaves freed during the war would remain free. Third, the United States would pay for consensual colonization
January 4, 1863 Lincoln and Halleck order Ulysses S. Grant to rescind Special Order 11
  Henry Halleck
  Ulysses S. Grant
January 25, 1863 Abraham Lincoln relieves General Ambrose Burnside [US} from command of the Army of the Potomac, replacing him with General Joseph "Fighting Joe" Hooker.
  Joseph Hooker
  Ambrose Burnside
  Army of the Potomac
January 26, 1863 In a letter to Joe Hooker, President Lincoln states that Hooker "...thwarted him (Burnside) as much as you could..."
  Joseph Hooker
  Ambrose Burnside
  Letter, Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker
February 13, 1863 President Lincoln is visited by diminutive circus act General Tom Thumb and his wife.
February 26, 1863 The National Currency Act was signed into law by President Lincoln, creating a national banking system, a Currency Bureau and the office of Comptroller of the Currency. The act's goal was to establish a single currency.
March 3, 1863 The Conscription Act (National Enrollment Act of 1863) is signed into law by President Lincoln. Congress requires quotas of draftees by state, but allows wealthy Americans the right to buy their way out of service for $300.00. Also called the Draft Act or any number of variations.
April 5, 1863 After sailing from Washington, D. C. to Fredericksburg, Abraham Lincoln meets with Joe Hooker to discuss strategy in Virginia.
  Joseph Hooker
April 20, 1863 Lincoln proclaims that West Virginia would join the Union on June 20, 1863 West Virginia
May 22, 1863 Abraham Lincoln offers command of the Army of the Potomac to Darius Couch. Couch refuses, but recommends George Meade.
  Darius Couch
  George Meade
June 4, 1863 Abraham Lincoln suggests the ban on the Chicago Times be lifted and Edwin Stanton orders Ambrose Burnsides to do it
  Ambrose Burnside
  Edwin Stanton
August 10, 1863 President Lincoln meets with former slave and abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Among the topics discussed are the treatment and pay of black soldiers in the U. S. Army
  Frederick Douglass
September 21, 1863 Mortally wounded at Chickamauga, Confederate Brigadier General Benjamin "Ben" Hardin Helms dies. He was Abraham Lincoln's brother-in-law. Georgia
  Battle of Chickamauga
  Generals Who Died In the Civil War
September 23, 1863 President Lincoln orders the 11th and 12th Corps to Stevenson, Alabama to relieve the Army of the Cumberland surrounded in Chattanooga.
  Battles for Chattanooga
  Army of the Cumberland
September 26, 1863 President Lincoln and members of his Administration are distressed that troop movements aiding General Rosecrans in Chattanooga are published in the New York Post.
  Battles for Chattanooga
October 3, 1863 President Lincoln calls for a national day of Thanksgiving at the end of November.
November 2, 1863 President Lincoln is invited to make a few remarks at the dedication of the National Cemetery in Gettysburg Pennsylvania
November 9, 1863 President Abraham Lincoln goes to a play, The Marble Heart. John Wilkes Booth stars.
November 12, 1863 In response to former Louisiana Congressman Benjamin Flanders, Lincoln states "...the act of secession is legally nothing and needs no repealing." Louisiana
November 18, 1863 President Abraham Lincoln, William Seward and Frank Blair, along with diplomats, foreign visitors, a military guard and a Marine band leave Washington D. C. on a "special" 4-car train organized by the B&O Railroad Pennsylvania
  William Seward
November 19, 1863 At the dedication of the National Cemetery in Gettysburg President Lincoln delivers a two-minute speech. Immediately following the speech he calls it a "flat failure." The speech is known today as the Gettysburg Address Pennsylvania
  Gettysburg Address [Full Text]
  Civil War National Cemeteries
December 8, 1863 Proclaimation of Amnesty and Reconstruction offers a full pardon to any Southerner who participated in the rebellion as long as they took a "prescibed oath"
February 10, 1864 President Lincoln tries to rescue 6 horses from the White House stables during a fire. He is unsuccessful
February 22, 1864 Crisis in the Lincoln Administration over the Pomeroy Circular backing Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase as Republican candidate for President in the 1864 elections
  Salmon P. Chase
March 21, 1864 Abraham Lincoln signs legislation allowing Nevada and Colorado to become states even though they don't meet population requirements
May 20, 1864 President Lincoln signs the legislation creating the Official Records
  Official Records
June 8, 1864 The Republican National Convention nominates Abraham Lincoln to run for President and Andrew Johnson to run for Vice-President Maryland
  Election of 1864
  Republican Party
August 19, 1864 President Lincoln meets with Frederick Douglass for a second time. He asks for Douglass's assistance in moving slaves north in case the war is unsuccessful
  Frederick Douglass
November 8, 1864 Republican Abraham Lincoln defeats Democrat George McClellan to serve a second term as President of the United States. Andrew Johnson, a unionist from Tennessee is his Vice President
  Election of 1864
  George McClellan
  Andrew Johnson
  Republican Party
  Democratic Party
February 3, 1865 On the River Queen five men, US President Abraham Lincoln, US Secretary of State William Seward, CS Vice-president Alexander Stephens, along with John Campbell and RMT Hunter discuss peace terms at the Hampton Roads Conference near Fort Monroe. The conference was a failure. Virginia
  Hampton Roads
  William Seward
  Alexander Stephens
March 3, 1865 Abraham Lincoln issues instructions on surrender discussions. He gives Grant wide-ranging powers on military matters, but reserves political matters for himself
  Ulysses S. Grant
March 4, 1865 Lincoln outlines his second term talking directly to the Confederate people "...with malice toward none; with charity for all..." Andrew Johnson, replacing Henry Hamlin as Vice-president gives a rambling, drunk speech. He had been given too much whiskey as medicine by a doctor.
  Andrew Johnson
  Lincoln's Second Inaugural Speech [Full Text]
March 23, 1865 Abraham Lincoln leaves Washington for Ulysses S. Grant's headquarters in City Point. Virginia
March 27, 1865 Lincoln held a council of war with Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, and David Porter on the River Queen at City Point
  Ulysses S. Grant
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  David Porter
April 4, 1865 President Lincoln visits Richmond, walking to the Confederate White House among cheering crowds, mostly freed slaves. A detachment of 10 men protected him. Virginia
  Richmond, Virginia
April 14, 1865 United States President Abraham Lincoln is assassinated on Good Friday by John Wilkes Booth in Ford's Theatre, Washington, D. C.
  Ford's Theater
  Washington D. C.
April 15, 1865 Abraham Lincoln dies in a boardinghouse opposite Ford's Theater. Andrew Johnson takes the oath of office.
  Andrew Johnson
April 19, 1865 The nation mourns U. S. President Abraham Lincoln at his funeral in Washington, D. C.
  Washington D. C.


Abraham Lincoln

Nicknames: Abe Lincoln, Honest Abe

Brother-in-Law to Benjamin Hardin [CS], who died at the Battle of Chickamauga.


The Lincoln Log

Links appearing on this page:

Battle of Chickamauga

Civil War Encyclopedia >> People - Union Political

Abraham Lincoln was last changed on - December 11, 2007
Abraham Lincoln was added in 2005



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