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Civil War Timeline
Chronology for September 19

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September 19, 1850 Millard Fillmore signs the last of the Acts approved by Congress that comprise the Compromise of 1850
  Compromise of 1850
  Causes of the Civil War
  Millard Fillmore
September 19, 1861 Crossing into Kentucky through the Cumberland Pass, Brigadier General Felix Zollicoffer disperses a small federal garrison at Barboursville Kentucky
  Felix Zollicoffer
September 19, 1862 Battle of Iuka

William Rosecrans [US] beat Sterling Price [CS] who withdrew when scouts report a column under the command of Edward O. C. Ord was advancing from the Mississippi.
Mississippi
  William S. Rosecrans
  Sterling Price
September 19, 1862
September 20, 1862
Skirmishes at Shepherdstown, Ashby's Gap, Williamsport, and Hagerstown, as Confederates under A. P. Hill covered the retreat of the Army of Northern Virginia from Sharpsburg. Lee would keep a heavy cavalry presence in the area until October. Maryland
Virginia
West Virginia
  Antietam
  A. P. Hill
  Army of Northern Virginia
September 19, 1863
September 20, 1863
Battle of Chickamauga

General Braxton Bragg [CS] tries to split General William Rosecrans [US] forces as they try to return to the safety of Chattanooga. A second day breakthrough at the Brotherton Cabin forces the federals into a retreat, halted only by the Rock of Chickamauga, General George Thomas on Snodgrass Hill

The bloodiest two days in American history cost the Federals 1,657 dead, 9,756 wounded, and 4,757 missing for a total of 16,170 casualties out of 58,000 troops. The Confederate losses were 2,312 dead, 14,674 wounded and 1,468 for a total of 18,545 out of 66,000 troops.
Georgia
  Gordon Granger
  Bloodiest Civil War battles
  William S. Rosecrans
  Braxton Bragg
  George Thomas
  John Bell Hood
  Army of the Cumberland
  Philip Sheridan
  Nathan Bedford Forrest
  Lafayette McLaws
  Battle of Chickamauga
  James Garfield
  Leonidas Polk
  Daniel Harvey Hill
  James Longstreet
  Chickamauga Campaign
September 19, 1864 3rd battle of Winchester (Opequon Creek)

Phil Sheridan [US], with a force of 40,000 men, strikes Jubal Early's [CS] 14,000 man Confederate army north of Winchester. Sheridan simply overpowered the Confederates. General Robert E. Rodes was mortally wounded in the conflict.
Virginia
  Jubal Anderson Early
  Generals Who Died In the Civil War
  Philip Sheridan
September 19, 1866 Oregon ratifies the 14th Amendment Oregon
  14th Amendment
September 19, 1881 James A. Garfield dies from disease introduced by unsanitary medical practices in an attempt to remove an assassin's bullet.
  James Garfield

Ongoing on this day:
June 15, 1864
April 2, 1865
Siege of Petersburg Virginia
  Robert E. Lee
  P. G. T. Beauregard
  Army of Northern Virginia
  Ulysses S. Grant
  Siege of Petersburg
April 12, 1861
May 10, 1865
The American Civil War
  The Civil War
September 12, 1861
September 20, 1861
Battle of Lexington

Sterling Price, with 18,000 men, lays siege to Lexington, Missouri, with a federal force of 3.600 under Colonel James Mulligan. After fighting intensified on September 19, Mulligan surrendered on the 20th.
Missouri
  Sterling Price
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